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The Niagara Christian Fellowship Chapel began services in 1951, and formally organized in 1957. The first building was occupied in 1954. The congregation originated through outreach by the Ontario Conference of Mennonite Brethren Churches and Virgil Mennonite Brethren Church.

In 1994 Niagara Christian Fellowship Chapel merged with Virgil Mennonite Brethren Church to form Cornerstone Community Church on the site of the Virgil church. The building was sold to an Old Colony Mennonite congregation.

In 1965 there were 76 members; in 1975, 100; in 1985, 80; in 1992, 73. The congregation ceased as a separate congregation in 1994. It had been affiliated with the Ontario Conference of Mennonite Brethren Churches (1957-94), the Canadian Conference of Mennonite Brethren Churches (1958-94) and the General Conference of Mennonite Brethren (1960-94). The language of worship was English.

Group 6, R.R. 3, Niagara-on-the-Lake, ON. The church was located between Lines 3 and 4 on Concession 2. Pastor Gus Quadrizius served in 1992 as a salaried congregational leader.

[edit] Bibliography

Friesen, C. Alfred. Memoirs of the Virgil-Niagara Mennonites. 1984: 49-51.

Mennonite Brethren Herald (27 May 1988): 51; (18 March 1994): 17.

Niagara Christian Fellowship Chapel, 15th anniversary. 1969, 20 pp.


Author(s) Sam Steiner
Date Published February 2012


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Steiner, Sam. "Niagara Christian Fellowship Chapel (Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario, Canada)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. February 2012. Web. 18 Dec 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Niagara_Christian_Fellowship_Chapel_(Niagara-on-the-Lake,_Ontario,_Canada)&oldid=76289.

APA style

Steiner, Sam. (February 2012). Niagara Christian Fellowship Chapel (Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario, Canada). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 18 December 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Niagara_Christian_Fellowship_Chapel_(Niagara-on-the-Lake,_Ontario,_Canada)&oldid=76289.




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