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A branch of the Nafzigers settled in [[Luxembourg|Luxembourg]] early in the 19th century and furnished several preachers there. Another branch settled in Bavaria at about the same time, from which [[Nafziger, Christian (1776/78-1836)|Christian Nafziger]] emigrated to [[Canada|Canada]] in 1826 to found the Amish Mennonite settlement in Wilmot Township, [[Waterloo County (Ontario, Canada)|Waterloo County]], Ontario. Peter Nafziger (1789-1885) moved from Europe to [[Butler County (Ohio, USA)|Butler County]], Ohio, in 1831, where he became a prominent bishop. John Naffziger (1802-1856) emigrated from Lorraine in 1837 to the [[Metamora Mennonite Church (Metamora, Illinois, USA)|Metamora]] settlement in Woodford County, Illinois, where he served as a bishop. Nafzigers have been numerous in the central Illinois [[Amish|Amish]] Mennonite settlement (especially Hopedale and Metamora), the Fulton County, Ohio, settlement, and in Butler County, Ohio.
 
A branch of the Nafzigers settled in [[Luxembourg|Luxembourg]] early in the 19th century and furnished several preachers there. Another branch settled in Bavaria at about the same time, from which [[Nafziger, Christian (1776/78-1836)|Christian Nafziger]] emigrated to [[Canada|Canada]] in 1826 to found the Amish Mennonite settlement in Wilmot Township, [[Waterloo County (Ontario, Canada)|Waterloo County]], Ontario. Peter Nafziger (1789-1885) moved from Europe to [[Butler County (Ohio, USA)|Butler County]], Ohio, in 1831, where he became a prominent bishop. John Naffziger (1802-1856) emigrated from Lorraine in 1837 to the [[Metamora Mennonite Church (Metamora, Illinois, USA)|Metamora]] settlement in Woodford County, Illinois, where he served as a bishop. Nafzigers have been numerous in the central Illinois [[Amish|Amish]] Mennonite settlement (especially Hopedale and Metamora), the Fulton County, Ohio, settlement, and in Butler County, Ohio.
 
 
 
= Bibliography =
 
= Bibliography =
 
Correll, Ernst. "The Value of Family History for Mennonite History with Illustrations from Nafziger Family Material." <em class="gameo_bibliography">Mennonite Quarterly Review</em> 2 (1928): 66-79, 151-54, 198-205.
 
Correll, Ernst. "The Value of Family History for Mennonite History with Illustrations from Nafziger Family Material." <em class="gameo_bibliography">Mennonite Quarterly Review</em> 2 (1928): 66-79, 151-54, 198-205.
  
 
<em class="gameo_bibliography">Naamlijst der tegenwoordig in dienst zijnde predikanten der Mennoniten in de vereenigde Nederlanden. </em>Amsterdam, 1829.
 
<em class="gameo_bibliography">Naamlijst der tegenwoordig in dienst zijnde predikanten der Mennoniten in de vereenigde Nederlanden. </em>Amsterdam, 1829.
 
 
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 3, p. 806; vol. 4, p. 1146|date=1957|a1_last=Bender|a1_first=Harold S|a2_last= |a2_first= }}
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 3, p. 806; vol. 4, p. 1146|date=1957|a1_last=Bender|a1_first=Harold S|a2_last= |a2_first= }}

Revision as of 18:51, 20 August 2013

Originally of Swiss origin this Mennonite name was found in the 18th century both in the Palatinate, where Johannes Nafziger who was elder of the Essingen congregation, and in Alsace, where Christian Nafziger was an elder of the Froensberg congregation from 1765 until after 1810, while Christian Nafziger, Jr., was an elder of the Stroeter congregation from about 1765 until after 1810. In Hesse, Hans Nafziger was a preacher in the district of Nassau-Weilburg 1786-ca. 1815, and Peter Nafziger about the end of the 18th century on the Kammerhof in the principality of Hesse-Darmstadt.

A branch of the Nafzigers settled in Luxembourg early in the 19th century and furnished several preachers there. Another branch settled in Bavaria at about the same time, from which Christian Nafziger emigrated to Canada in 1826 to found the Amish Mennonite settlement in Wilmot Township, Waterloo County, Ontario. Peter Nafziger (1789-1885) moved from Europe to Butler County, Ohio, in 1831, where he became a prominent bishop. John Naffziger (1802-1856) emigrated from Lorraine in 1837 to the Metamora settlement in Woodford County, Illinois, where he served as a bishop. Nafzigers have been numerous in the central Illinois Amish Mennonite settlement (especially Hopedale and Metamora), the Fulton County, Ohio, settlement, and in Butler County, Ohio.

Bibliography

Correll, Ernst. "The Value of Family History for Mennonite History with Illustrations from Nafziger Family Material." Mennonite Quarterly Review 2 (1928): 66-79, 151-54, 198-205.

Naamlijst der tegenwoordig in dienst zijnde predikanten der Mennoniten in de vereenigde Nederlanden. Amsterdam, 1829.


Author(s) Harold S Bender
Date Published 1957


Cite This Article

MLA style

Bender, Harold S. "Nafziger (Nafzger, Naffziger, Nafzinger, Naffzer, Naftziger, Nofziger, Noffsinger, Nofsker, Naftiger) family." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1957. Web. 31 Oct 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Nafziger_(Nafzger,_Naffziger,_Nafzinger,_Naffzer,_Naftziger,_Nofziger,_Noffsinger,_Nofsker,_Naftiger)_family&oldid=76072.

APA style

Bender, Harold S. (1957). Nafziger (Nafzger, Naffziger, Nafzinger, Naffzer, Naftziger, Nofziger, Noffsinger, Nofsker, Naftiger) family. Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 31 October 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Nafziger_(Nafzger,_Naffziger,_Nafzinger,_Naffzer,_Naftziger,_Nofziger,_Noffsinger,_Nofsker,_Naftiger)_family&oldid=76072.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 3, p. 806; vol. 4, p. 1146. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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