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Muntau hospital; postcard printed by "Kemnitz Eberswalde." Source: Mennonite Church USA Archives - North Newton, Kansas: 2003-0267.
The Muntau Hospital, located in the Molotschna Mennonite settlement, Ukraine, was established as a private enterprise in 1880 (or 1889?) by Franz Wall. After the death of the founder in 1906, his son Franz Wall, Jr., continued the work, assisted by his sister Elisabeth, a nurse. Before World War I it was enlarged to a 60-bed capacity. Franz Wall was exiled after the Revolution, and his sister came to Canada. The leading doctor was Erich Tavonius, who served the hospital as physician 1900-1927. In 1909 Morija, a deaconessinstitution closely connected with the Muntau Hospital, was established to train nurses. In 1913 Dr. Tavonius headed the hospital, assisted by Dr. Seiler as oculist and Dr. Büttner. After the Revolution the hospital was nationalized.

Bibliography

Mennonitisches Jahrbuch. (Gnadenfeld: Heinrich Dirks, 1913): 179.

Unser Blatt II (1927): 307.


Author(s) Cornelius Krahn
Date Published 1957


Cite This Article

MLA style

Krahn, Cornelius. "Muntau Hospital (Molotschna Mennonite Settlement, Zaporizhia Oblast, Ukraine)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1957. Web. 24 Jul 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Muntau_Hospital_(Molotschna_Mennonite_Settlement,_Zaporizhia_Oblast,_Ukraine)&oldid=89618.

APA style

Krahn, Cornelius. (1957). Muntau Hospital (Molotschna Mennonite Settlement, Zaporizhia Oblast, Ukraine). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 24 July 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Muntau_Hospital_(Molotschna_Mennonite_Settlement,_Zaporizhia_Oblast,_Ukraine)&oldid=89618.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 3, p. 784. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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