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Mount Clinton Mennonite Church (Mennonite Church USA), located one-half mile (1 km) west of Mount Clinton, Rockingham County, VA, belongs to the Central Bishop District of the Virginia Mennonite Conference. Services were held in schoolhouses before the Civil War for Burkholder, Layman, Myers, and Showalter families who had settled in the Muddy Creek "basin." The Weavers, Drivers, Brunks, Heltzels, Heatwoles, and Fences followed after the war. The first meetinghouse was dedicated on 3 January 1875 under the local leadership of Jacob and Joseph N. Driver. The old frame church was replaced by a brick structure on the opposite (north) side of the highway in 1916. This church in 1955 was one of the four home churches of the Middle District of the Virginia Conference. In 1955 few Mennonites lived in this area. It depended to some extent on Mennonite families who did not live near here. Sem S. Weaver was a resident minister for many years. The membership in 1956 was 109, with C. K. Lehman as pastor. In 2003 the congregation had 133 members, with Lee Martin serving as pastor.


Author(s) Harry A Brunk
Date Published 1957


Cite This Article

MLA style

Brunk, Harry A. "Mount Clinton Mennonite Church (Harrisonburg, Virginia, USA)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1957. Web. 14 Jul 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Mount_Clinton_Mennonite_Church_(Harrisonburg,_Virginia,_USA)&oldid=90198.

APA style

Brunk, Harry A. (1957). Mount Clinton Mennonite Church (Harrisonburg, Virginia, USA). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 14 July 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Mount_Clinton_Mennonite_Church_(Harrisonburg,_Virginia,_USA)&oldid=90198.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 3, p. 758. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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