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The Missouri-Iowa Mennonite Conference ([[Mennonite Church (MC)|Mennonite Church]]) was organized in 1873 (first meeting at the Bethel Church, [[Morgan County and Moniteau County (Missouri, USA)|Moniteau County]], Missouri, on 24 October 1873) as the Mennonite Conference of Missouri, Iowa, and eastern Kansas, later extended to include the few Mennonite (MC) congregations west of [[Illinois (USA)|Illinois]] in [[Louisiana (USA)|Louisiana]], [[Texas (USA)|Texas]], [[Minnesota (USA)|Minnesota]], and [[North Dakota (USA)|North Dakota]]. When the merger and reorganization of the Mennonite and [[Amish Mennonites|Amish Mennonite]] conferences west of [[Indiana (USA)|Indiana]] took place in 1920-1921, this conference was dissolved, and its congregations redistributed among the Missouri-Kansas (later [[South Central Mennonite Conference (Mennonite Church USA)|South Central]]), [[Iowa-Nebraska Mennonite Conference (Mennonite Church)|Iowa-Nebraska]], and Dakota-Montana (later [[North Central Conference of the Mennonite Church (Mennonite Church USA)|North Central]]) conferences. In 1920 the Missouri-Iowa Conference included the following 17 congregations, with a membership of 723: [[Missouri (USA)|&lt;em&gt;Missouri&lt;/em&gt;]] 434—[[Mount Zion Mennonite Church (Versailles, Missouri, USA)|Mount Zion]] at Versailles 89, [[Bethel Mennonite Church (Garden City, Missouri, USA)|Bethel at]][[Garden City (Missouri, USA)|Garden City]] 110, Proctor 14, Palmyra 24, Pea Ridge 40, [[Mount Pisgah Mennonite Church (Leonard, Missouri, USA)|Mount Pisgah]] at Cherry Box 42, [[White Hall Mennonite Church (Oronogo, Missouri, USA)|White Hall]] at Oronogo 65, Jasper 16, Oakland 17, [[Berea Mennonite Community Church (Birth Tree, Missouri, USA)|Berea]] at Birch Tree 49, and five missions: [[Iowa (USA)|&lt;em&gt;Iowa&lt;/em&gt;]] 57—[[Liberty Mennonite Church (South English, Iowa, USA)|Liberty]] at South English 50, [[Coal Creek Preaching Point (What Cheer, Iowa, USA)|Coal Creek]] at What Cheer 7; <em>Minnesota</em>—Alpha 42; <em>North Dakota</em> 89—[[Fairview Mennonite Church (Surrey, North Dakota, USA)|Fairview]] at Surrey 43, Spring Valley at Baden 46; <em>Montana</em> 24—[[Bloomfield (Montana, USA)|Bloomfield]] 20, [[Coalridge Mennonite Church (Dagmar, Montana, USA)|Coalridge]] 4; <em>Texas</em>—[[Tuleta Mennonite Church (Tuleta, Texas, USA)|Tuleta]] 49; <em>Louisiana</em>—[[Lake Charles Mennonite Church (Lake Charles, Louisiana, USA)|Lake Charles]] 15, Allemands 13. Among the outstanding leaders of the conference were D. D. Kauffman (d. 1896) of Versailles, [[Kreider, John Mellinger (1869-1946)|J. M. Kreider]] (dead 1946) of Palmyra, J. R. Shank of Carver, [[Mininger, Jacob D. (1879-1941)|J. D. Mininger]] (d. 1941) of [[Kansas City (Kansas and Missouri, USA)|Kansas City]], and Andrew Shenk (dead 1937) of Oronogo, Missouri, USA).
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The Missouri-Iowa Mennonite Conference ([[Mennonite Church (MC)|Mennonite Church]]) was organized in 1873 (first meeting at the Bethel Church, [[Morgan County and Moniteau County (Missouri, USA)|Moniteau County]], Missouri, on 24 October 1873) as the Mennonite Conference of Missouri, Iowa, and eastern Kansas, later extended to include the few Mennonite (MC) congregations west of [[Illinois (USA)|Illinois]] in [[Louisiana (USA)|Louisiana]], [[Texas (USA)|Texas]], [[Minnesota (USA)|Minnesota]], and [[North Dakota (USA)|North Dakota]]. When the merger and reorganization of the Mennonite and [[Amish Mennonites|Amish Mennonite]] conferences west of [[Indiana (USA)|Indiana]] took place in 1920-1921, this conference was dissolved, and its congregations redistributed among the Missouri-Kansas (later [[South Central Mennonite Conference (Mennonite Church USA)|South Central]]), [[Iowa-Nebraska Mennonite Conference (Mennonite Church)|Iowa-Nebraska]], and Dakota-Montana (later [[North Central Conference of the Mennonite Church (Mennonite Church USA)|North Central]]) conferences. In 1920 the Missouri-Iowa Conference included the following 17 congregations, with a membership of 723: [[Missouri (USA)|<em>Missouri</em>]] 434—[[Mount Zion Mennonite Church (Versailles, Missouri, USA)|Mount Zion]] at Versailles 89, [[Bethel Mennonite Church (Garden City, Missouri, USA)|Bethel at ]][[Garden City (Missouri, USA)|Garden City]] 110, Proctor 14, Palmyra 24, Pea Ridge 40, [[Mount Pisgah Mennonite Church (Leonard, Missouri, USA)|Mount Pisgah]] at Cherry Box 42, [[White Hall Mennonite Church (Oronogo, Missouri, USA)|White Hall]] at Oronogo 65, Jasper 16, Oakland 17, [[Berea Mennonite Community Church (Birth Tree, Missouri, USA)|Berea]] at Birch Tree 49, and five missions: [[Iowa (USA)|<em>Iowa</em>]] 57—[[Liberty Mennonite Church (South English, Iowa, USA)|Liberty]] at South English 50, [[Coal Creek Preaching Point (What Cheer, Iowa, USA)|Coal Creek]] at What Cheer 7; <em>Minnesota</em>—Alpha 42; <em>North Dakota</em> 89—[[Fairview Mennonite Church (Surrey, North Dakota, USA)|Fairview]] at Surrey 43, Spring Valley at Baden 46; <em>Montana</em> 24—[[Bloomfield (Montana, USA)|Bloomfield]] 20, [[Coalridge Mennonite Church (Dagmar, Montana, USA)|Coalridge]] 4; <em>Texas</em>—[[Tuleta Mennonite Church (Tuleta, Texas, USA)|Tuleta]] 49; <em>Louisiana</em>—[[Lake Charles Mennonite Church (Lake Charles, Louisiana, USA)|Lake Charles]] 15, Allemands 13. Among the outstanding leaders of the conference were D. D. Kauffman (d. 1896) of Versailles, [[Kreider, John Mellinger (1869-1946)|J. M. Kreider]] (dead 1946) of Palmyra, J. R. Shank of Carver, [[Mininger, Jacob D. (1879-1941)|J. D. Mininger]] (d. 1941) of [[Kansas City (Kansas and Missouri, USA)|Kansas City]], and Andrew Shenk (dead 1937) of Oronogo, Missouri, USA).
  
 
The conference had a district mission board for home mission work, organized in 1898, and a Sunday school conference, organized before 1905.
 
The conference had a district mission board for home mission work, organized in 1898, and a Sunday school conference, organized before 1905.
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 3, p. 719|date=1957|a1_last=Bender|a1_first=Harold S|a2_last= |a2_first= }}
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 3, p. 719|date=1957|a1_last=Bender|a1_first=Harold S|a2_last= |a2_first= }}

Revision as of 14:11, 23 August 2013

The Missouri-Iowa Mennonite Conference (Mennonite Church) was organized in 1873 (first meeting at the Bethel Church, Moniteau County, Missouri, on 24 October 1873) as the Mennonite Conference of Missouri, Iowa, and eastern Kansas, later extended to include the few Mennonite (MC) congregations west of Illinois in Louisiana, Texas, Minnesota, and North Dakota. When the merger and reorganization of the Mennonite and Amish Mennonite conferences west of Indiana took place in 1920-1921, this conference was dissolved, and its congregations redistributed among the Missouri-Kansas (later South Central), Iowa-Nebraska, and Dakota-Montana (later North Central) conferences. In 1920 the Missouri-Iowa Conference included the following 17 congregations, with a membership of 723: Missouri 434—Mount Zion at Versailles 89, Bethel at Garden City 110, Proctor 14, Palmyra 24, Pea Ridge 40, Mount Pisgah at Cherry Box 42, White Hall at Oronogo 65, Jasper 16, Oakland 17, Berea at Birch Tree 49, and five missions: Iowa 57—Liberty at South English 50, Coal Creek at What Cheer 7; Minnesota—Alpha 42; North Dakota 89—Fairview at Surrey 43, Spring Valley at Baden 46; Montana 24—Bloomfield 20, Coalridge 4; TexasTuleta 49; LouisianaLake Charles 15, Allemands 13. Among the outstanding leaders of the conference were D. D. Kauffman (d. 1896) of Versailles, J. M. Kreider (dead 1946) of Palmyra, J. R. Shank of Carver, J. D. Mininger (d. 1941) of Kansas City, and Andrew Shenk (dead 1937) of Oronogo, Missouri, USA).

The conference had a district mission board for home mission work, organized in 1898, and a Sunday school conference, organized before 1905.


Author(s) Harold S Bender
Date Published 1957


Cite This Article

MLA style

Bender, Harold S. "Missouri-Iowa Mennonite Conference (Mennonite Church)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1957. Web. 25 Oct 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Missouri-Iowa_Mennonite_Conference_(Mennonite_Church)&oldid=92881.

APA style

Bender, Harold S. (1957). Missouri-Iowa Mennonite Conference (Mennonite Church). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 25 October 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Missouri-Iowa_Mennonite_Conference_(Mennonite_Church)&oldid=92881.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 3, p. 719. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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