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Matthijs van Balk (Mathias van Balck, Matthias Belkensis, or Maes de Schoenmaker) was probably a native of Balk, Dutch province of Friesland, and was a leader in the revolutionary wing of Anabaptism. After the fall of Oldeklooster in March 1534 he fled from Friesland to Ommelanden, Dutch province of Groningen, where he met with other revolutionary leaders like Jan van Batenburg, whom he won over to his group. About his activity during the Münster period nothing is known. In the summer of 1536 he was among the Anabaptist leaders who met at Bocholt (Boekholt), Westphalia, where he defended the Münsterite principles of force and polygamy against Jan Matthijsz van Middelburg and Jan Smeitgen van Tricht. He is said then to have been of an advanced age. Here his trace is lost.

Bibliography

Doopsgezinde Bijdragen (1917): 120; (No. 119): 138; (1919): 193.

Kühler, Wilhelmus Johannes. Geschiedenis der Nederlandsche Doopsgezinden in de Zestiende Eeuw. Haarlem: H.D. Tjeenk Willink, 1932: 201.

Mellink, Albert F. De Wederdopers in de noordelijke Nederlanden 1531-1544. Groningen: J.B. Wolters, 1954: passim, see Index.

Vos, Karel. Menno Simons. Leiden, 1914: 41.


Author(s) Nanne van der Zijpp
Date Published 1957


Cite This Article

MLA style

van der Zijpp, Nanne. "Matthijs van Balk (16th century)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1957. Web. 21 Apr 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Matthijs_van_Balk_(16th_century)&oldid=89501.

APA style

van der Zijpp, Nanne. (1957). Matthijs van Balk (16th century). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 21 April 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Matthijs_van_Balk_(16th_century)&oldid=89501.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 3, p. 541. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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