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The Markstay Mennonite Mission was located two km north of Highway 17 near Sudbury, Ontario. It opened in 1936 under the leadership of Walter McDowell and Arthur Gingrich, and sponsored by the Mennonite Mission Board of Ontario. The first impulse for the work had been given by Linford Hackman.

The work had periods of progress and decline, but never developed into a strong congregation. In 1954 the total membership was 7, although by 1948 over 75 persons had professed conversion and 22 persons had been baptized.

At various times "outposts" from the Markstay church were established, with Summer Bible schools and Sunday schools conducted at locations like Mountville, Whitefish, Nairn and Virginiatown near Kirkland Lake.

Minister Amzie Brubacher served in the 1960s as a congregational leader. The congregation dissolved in 1965. It had been affiliated with the Mennonite Conference of Ontario.

Bibliography

Christian Monitor (November 1939): 334.

Smith, Roy H. "Markstay-Monetville." 1954, Mennonite Archives of Ontario.


Author(s) Arthur Gingrich
Marlene Epp
Date Published January 1989


Cite This Article

MLA style

Gingrich, Arthur and Marlene Epp. "Markstay Union Church (Markstay, Ontario, Canada)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. January 1989. Web. 28 Dec 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Markstay_Union_Church_(Markstay,_Ontario,_Canada)&oldid=105093.

APA style

Gingrich, Arthur and Marlene Epp. (January 1989). Markstay Union Church (Markstay, Ontario, Canada). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 28 December 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Markstay_Union_Church_(Markstay,_Ontario,_Canada)&oldid=105093.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 3, p. 490. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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