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Maarse (Maarsse, Maarsen), a Dutch Mennonite family of Aalsmeer, province of North Holland, found there from about 1700. Many members of this family were deacons of the various congregations found at Aalsmeer. A member of this family was Jan Maarse, b. 1886 at Amsterdam. He earned his doctorate in chemistry at the University of Amsterdam in 1913, served as a professor of chemistry 1914-1930. During this time he began the study of theology at the University and the Mennonite Seminary of Amsterdam. Becoming a ministerial candidate in 1932, he served the congregations of Krommenie-Wormer-Jisp 1932-1947 and Edam-Monnikendam 1947-1951. In this year he retired. In 1936 he obtained his Th.D. degree (thesis: Een psychologische en zedekundige studie over de begrippen eer en eergevoel). Besides this and a number of papers in chemical and theological periodicals, he edited in 1939 and 1947, together with N. Westendorp Boerma, two posthumous works of I. J. de Bussy and in 1955 a psychological-ethical study, Toom, haat en zelfbeheersing (Anger, Hatred, and Self-control).


Author(s) Nanne van der Zijpp
Date Published 1957


Cite This Article

MLA style

Zijpp, Nanne van der. "Maarse (Maarsse, Maarsen) family." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1957. Web. 26 Dec 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Maarse_(Maarsse,_Maarsen)_family&oldid=119848.

APA style

Zijpp, Nanne van der. (1957). Maarse (Maarsse, Maarsen) family. Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 26 December 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Maarse_(Maarsse,_Maarsen)_family&oldid=119848.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 3, p. 428. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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