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The Lehman Preaching appointment began services in 1854. Jacob Lehman is considered the founding leader of the group; he immigrated to Ellice Township from the Alsace in 1840 and settled at Kurtzville. The congregation originated through migration to the area and immigration from Europe.

Initially services were held at three month intervals until 1865 when they were held every eight weeks. Later services alternated with Wallace Mennonite at Kurtzville. Communion was served from the earliest date until the membership decreased. The community consisted of Jacob Lehman's family and in-laws by the name of Weber and Shellenberger. Jacob Lehman and his wife, a Showalter, are buried at the Martin's Church cemetery in Waterloo, Ontario.

The congregation dissolved in 1880. It had been affiliated with the Mennonite Conference of Ontario since 1854. The language of worship was German.

Bibliography

Burkholder, L. J. A Brief History of the Mennonites in Ontario. Kitchener, ON: Mennonite Conference of Ontario, 1935: 127.


Author(s) Joseph C. Fretz
Marlene Epp
Date Published April 1986


Cite This Article

MLA style

Fretz, Joseph C. and Marlene Epp. "Lehman Preaching Appointment (Milverton, Ontario, Canada)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. April 1986. Web. 26 Oct 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Lehman_Preaching_Appointment_(Milverton,_Ontario,_Canada)&oldid=88993.

APA style

Fretz, Joseph C. and Marlene Epp. (April 1986). Lehman Preaching Appointment (Milverton, Ontario, Canada). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 26 October 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Lehman_Preaching_Appointment_(Milverton,_Ontario,_Canada)&oldid=88993.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 3, p. 314. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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