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Jacob Krehbiel, a Mennonite farmer on the Randeckerhof near Alsenborn, Palatinate, Germany, was born 5 January 1835 at Obersulzen, and he died 26 July 1918. Besides being a very successful farmer, he also did considerable writing. He wrote various stories, "Der Engel Wacht," "Die Werber," "Der Bubendieb," "Aus dem Kavalleristenleben," "Ein passiver Soldat," "Der Bote," and "Wer mag's deuten?" which were published in Jugendblätter (1865-69). Without formal education, he was well informed in several intellectual fields, such as history, religion, politics, etc. He was also active in the Sembach  church, serving as its president after 1885 with great devotion, and he attended and took part in the south German Mennonite conferences. As a citizen he was always ready by word or deed to serve any cause for the common good (Gem.-Kal., 1920, 37-50). Worthy of mention is his energetic rejection of the brochure by pastor Helferich on infant baptism.

Bibliography

Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. Mennonitisches Lexikon, 4 vols. Frankfurt & Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe: Schneider, 1913-1967: v. II, 566.

Mennonitische Blätter (1865): 78 f.

Mennonitischer Gemeinde-Kalender (1920): 37-50.


Author(s) Christian Neff
Date Published 1957


Cite This Article

MLA style

Neff, Christian. "Krehbiel, Jakob (1835-1918)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1957. Web. 23 Oct 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Krehbiel,_Jakob_(1835-1918)&oldid=105794.

APA style

Neff, Christian. (1957). Krehbiel, Jakob (1835-1918). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 23 October 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Krehbiel,_Jakob_(1835-1918)&oldid=105794.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 3, p. 238. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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