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Knipscheer was a Dutch Mennonite family. Jan Knipscheer (1836-1927), married to Wilhelmina Johanna Meihuizen, was at first a teacher at Weesperkarspel; he then founded a private school at [[Amsterdam (Noord-Holland, Netherlands)|Amsterdam]], serving at the same time as catechist of the Amsterdam Mennonite congregation. His son Jacob Frederik Knipscheer (22 May 1865-20 February 1954) studied at the University and the [[Amsterdam Mennonite Theological Seminary (Kweekschool)|Mennonite Seminary]][[Amsterdam Mennonite Theological Seminary (Kweekschool)|of Amsterdam]] 1881-1887, and then served the congregations of [[Baard (Friesland, Netherlands)|Baard]] 1888-1890 and [[Knollendam (Noord-Holland, Netherlands)|Knollendam]] 1890-1930. For many years he was secretary of the [[Pension Funds of the Dutch Mennonites|&lt;em&gt;Zaan&lt;/em&gt;]]<em>[[Pension Funds of the Dutch Mennonites|sche Emeritaat en Invaliditeitsfonds]]. </em>His brother Frederik Samuel Knipscheer, born at Amsterdam in 1871, who studied at the Mennonite Seminary 1890-1896, joined the Reformed Church in 1898 and was pastor at [[Akersloot (Noord-Holland, Netherlands)|Akersloot]]1898, Grosthuizen 1903, and Zaltbommel 1911. He died in 1955. He published several historical books and papers (see Bibliography). Leendert Desiderius Gerardus Knipscheer (17 July 1903-3 February 1989), son of J. F. Knipscheer, after having studied at the [[Amsterdam, University of (Amsterdam, Netherlands)|Amsterdam Uni]][[Amsterdam, University of (Amsterdam, Netherlands)|versity]] and Mennonite Seminary, served at [[Oudebildtzijl (Friesland, Netherlands)|Oudebildtzijl]] 1925-1931, [[Dantumawoude (Friesland, Netherlands)|Dantumawoude]] 1931-1935, and beginning 1935 at [[Groningen (Groningen, Netherlands)|Groningen]]. He became the editor of the <em>Doopsgezind ]aarboekje</em> in 1949, and published (together with H. Bremer) <em>Wie</em><em> zijn wij? </em>(Groningen, 1947) and <em>Verhalen uit de Doopsgezinde Geschiedenis </em>(Amsterdam, n.d.-1953). His youngest son (28 July 1945) was also named Leendert Desiderius Gerardus; he served as a pastor 1971-2010 in Amsterdam, [[Veenwouden (Friesland, Netherlands)|Veenwouden]], [[Texel (Noord-Holland, Netherlands)|Texel]] and Damwoude.
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Knipscheer was a Dutch Mennonite family. Jan Knipscheer (1836-1927), married to Wilhelmina Johanna Meihuizen, was at first a teacher at Weesperkarspel; he then founded a private school at [[Amsterdam (Noord-Holland, Netherlands)|Amsterdam]], serving at the same time as catechist of the Amsterdam Mennonite congregation. His son Jacob Frederik Knipscheer (22 May 1865-20 February 1954) studied at the University and the [[Amsterdam Mennonite Theological Seminary (Kweekschool)|Mennonite Seminary ]][[Amsterdam Mennonite Theological Seminary (Kweekschool)|of Amsterdam]] 1881-1887, and then served the congregations of [[Baard (Friesland, Netherlands)|Baard]] 1888-1890 and [[Knollendam (Noord-Holland, Netherlands)|Knollendam]] 1890-1930. For many years he was secretary of the [[Pension Funds of the Dutch Mennonites|<em>Zaan</em>]]<em>[[Pension Funds of the Dutch Mennonites|sche Emeritaat en Invaliditeitsfonds]]. </em>His brother Frederik Samuel Knipscheer, born at Amsterdam in 1871, who studied at the Mennonite Seminary 1890-1896, joined the Reformed Church in 1898 and was pastor at [[Akersloot (Noord-Holland, Netherlands)|Akersloot ]]1898, Grosthuizen 1903, and Zaltbommel 1911. He died in 1955. He published several historical books and papers (see Bibliography). Leendert Desiderius Gerardus Knipscheer (17 July 1903-3 February 1989), son of J. F. Knipscheer, after having studied at the [[Amsterdam, University of (Amsterdam, Netherlands)|Amsterdam Uni]][[Amsterdam, University of (Amsterdam, Netherlands)|versity]] and Mennonite Seminary, served at [[Oudebildtzijl (Friesland, Netherlands)|Oudebildtzijl]] 1925-1931, [[Dantumawoude (Friesland, Netherlands)|Dantumawoude]] 1931-1935, and beginning 1935 at [[Groningen (Groningen, Netherlands)|Groningen]]. He became the editor of the <em>Doopsgezind ]aarboekje</em> in 1949, and published (together with H. Bremer) <em>Wie</em><em> zijn wij? </em>(Groningen, 1947) and <em>Verhalen uit de Doopsgezinde Geschiedenis </em>(Amsterdam, n.d.-1953). His youngest son (28 July 1945) was also named Leendert Desiderius Gerardus; he served as a pastor 1971-2010 in Amsterdam, [[Veenwouden (Friesland, Netherlands)|Veenwouden]], [[Texel (Noord-Holland, Netherlands)|Texel]] and Damwoude.
 
= Bibliography =
 
= Bibliography =
 
Knipscheer, Frederik Samuel. "Abdias Widemarius twistgesprekken met de Mennisten." <em>Doopsgezinde Bijdragen </em>(1907)<em>.</em>
 
Knipscheer, Frederik Samuel. "Abdias Widemarius twistgesprekken met de Mennisten." <em>Doopsgezinde Bijdragen </em>(1907)<em>.</em>

Revision as of 14:41, 23 August 2013

Knipscheer was a Dutch Mennonite family. Jan Knipscheer (1836-1927), married to Wilhelmina Johanna Meihuizen, was at first a teacher at Weesperkarspel; he then founded a private school at Amsterdam, serving at the same time as catechist of the Amsterdam Mennonite congregation. His son Jacob Frederik Knipscheer (22 May 1865-20 February 1954) studied at the University and the Mennonite Seminary of Amsterdam 1881-1887, and then served the congregations of Baard 1888-1890 and Knollendam 1890-1930. For many years he was secretary of the Zaansche Emeritaat en Invaliditeitsfonds. His brother Frederik Samuel Knipscheer, born at Amsterdam in 1871, who studied at the Mennonite Seminary 1890-1896, joined the Reformed Church in 1898 and was pastor at Akersloot 1898, Grosthuizen 1903, and Zaltbommel 1911. He died in 1955. He published several historical books and papers (see Bibliography). Leendert Desiderius Gerardus Knipscheer (17 July 1903-3 February 1989), son of J. F. Knipscheer, after having studied at the Amsterdam University and Mennonite Seminary, served at Oudebildtzijl 1925-1931, Dantumawoude 1931-1935, and beginning 1935 at Groningen. He became the editor of the Doopsgezind ]aarboekje in 1949, and published (together with H. Bremer) Wie zijn wij? (Groningen, 1947) and Verhalen uit de Doopsgezinde Geschiedenis (Amsterdam, n.d.-1953). His youngest son (28 July 1945) was also named Leendert Desiderius Gerardus; he served as a pastor 1971-2010 in Amsterdam, Veenwouden, Texel and Damwoude.

Bibliography

Knipscheer, Frederik Samuel. "Abdias Widemarius twistgesprekken met de Mennisten." Doopsgezinde Bijdragen (1907).

Knipscheer, Frederik Samuel. De Nederlandsche gereformerde synoden tegenover de Doopsgezinden, 1563-1620." Doopsgezinde Bijdragen (1910, 1911).

Knipscheer, Frederik Samuel. "Geschiedenis van het stil en het stemmelijk gebed bij de Nederlandsche Doopsgezinden." Doopsgezinde Bijdragen (1897, 1898).


Author(s) Nanne van der Zijpp
Date Published May 2011


Cite This Article

MLA style

van der Zijpp, Nanne. "Knipscheer family." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. May 2011. Web. 28 Dec 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Knipscheer_family&oldid=95567.

APA style

van der Zijpp, Nanne. (May 2011). Knipscheer family. Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 28 December 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Knipscheer_family&oldid=95567.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 3, p. 208. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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