From GAMEO
Jump to: navigation, search

Ulrich Kipher, deacon of the Mennonite congregation in the Emmental, canton of Bern, Switzerland, was born near Langnau in 1772. He passed through the changes of the 1830s in the Emmental churches, and wrote an exact, detailed account of the division of 1835 (see Bern, Samuel Frohlich, and Neutäufer). For a long time he corresponded with the Mennonites living in the Palatinate. In March 1810 Ulrich Kipfer, Nikolaus Gerber, Christian Gerber, and Christian Brand made a futile appeal to the cantonal government of Bern requesting the observance of the rights granted the Mennonites in 1799 by the "Act of Toleration." In 1850 Kipfer helped to draw up the petition to the government at Bern for military exemption for the Mennonites, and was one of the signatories.

[edit] Bibliography

Gratz, Delbert L. Bernese Anabaptists and their American descendants. Goshen, IN: Mennonite Historical Society, 1953. Reprinted Elverson, PA: Old Springfield Shoppe, 1994: 100.

Geiser, Samuel. Die Taufgesinnten-Gemeinden : eine Kurzgefasste Darstellung der wichtigsten Ereignisse des Täufertums. Karlsruhe: H. Schneider, [1931]: 467, 474.

Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. Mennonitisches Lexikon, 4 vols. Frankfurt & Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe: Schneider, 1913-1967: v. II, 494.


Author(s) Samuel Geiser
Date Published 1957


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Geiser, Samuel. "Kipfer, Ulrich (b. 1772)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1957. Web. 13 Jul 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Kipfer,_Ulrich_(b._1772)&oldid=105749.

APA style

Geiser, Samuel. (1957). Kipfer, Ulrich (b. 1772). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 13 July 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Kipfer,_Ulrich_(b._1772)&oldid=105749.




Hpbuttns.gif
Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 3, pp. 178-179. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


©1996-2014 by the Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. All rights reserved.