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The Johnstown Mennonite Brethren Church, now extinct, had its origin in 1906, when a number of Mennonite Brethren families who had moved from Kirk to Loveland, Colorado, organized a congregation with Henry Nickel as leader. He was followed by Conrad Burkhart in 1914. By 1924 the membership numbered 37, the highest it ever achieved. In 1926 the Loveland church was relocated in Johnstown, Colorado. In the following years attendance ran as high as 100; however, being unable to buy or rent land, more and more people left for other Mennonite areas, especially in California. By 1943 the membership had dwindled to 21. After several years the remaining members joined the Evangelical Free Church and the Baptist Church in Greeley. At the 1948 Southern District Conference the church was officially dissolved.

The congregation was sometimes referred to as the Loveland Mennonite Brethren Church.


Author(s) Orlando Harms
P. C. Hiebert
Date Published 1957


Cite This Article

MLA style

Harms, Orlando and P. C. Hiebert. "Johnstown Mennonite Brethren Church (Johnstown, Colorado, USA)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1957. Web. 21 Aug 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Johnstown_Mennonite_Brethren_Church_(Johnstown,_Colorado,_USA)&oldid=88380.

APA style

Harms, Orlando and P. C. Hiebert. (1957). Johnstown Mennonite Brethren Church (Johnstown, Colorado, USA). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 21 August 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Johnstown_Mennonite_Brethren_Church_(Johnstown,_Colorado,_USA)&oldid=88380.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 3, p. 118, 405. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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