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Jeziorka (German, <em>Kleinsee</em>) was a village near the Vistula in the district of Schwetz, former territory of Polish Prussia. Some 13 Mennonites of Dutch origin, from [[Przechovka (Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship, Poland)|Przechovka]], settled there in 1727 to cultivate the land which had been laid waste by soldiers. The Mennonite group increased in 1732 when 12 families of the territory of [[Culm (Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship, Poland)|Culm]], persecuted by the Catholic bishop of Culm, also moved to Jeziorka. Like their mother church in [[Przechovka (Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship, Poland)|Przechovka]] the Mennonite group of Jeziorka belonged to the [[Groningen Old Flemish Mennonites|Groningen Old Flemish]] branch. Apparently they never formed an independent congregation, but were in one congregation with their brethren in [[Przechovka (Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship, Poland)|Przechovka]] and [[Deutsch Konopath (Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship, Poland)|Konopath]], although a church was built in Jeziorka in 1743. They sometimes were financially supported by the Dutch Mennonite Committee of Foreign Needs at Amsterdam. Though in the land leases of 1727 and again 1767 freedom of religion was granted to them, there were many difficulties with the Roman Catholic officials. Besides this the soil was too wet for profitable agriculture. For these and other reasons some of the Mennonites in 1765 moved to [[Brenkenhoffswalde and Franztal (Lubusz Voivodeship, Poland)|Brenkenhoffswalde and Franzthal]] in Neumark. In an official list of inhabitants of Jeziorka the following family names are found: Nagtigal (4), Ratzlaw (3), Becker (2), Unrau (2), Baller (1), Fott (1), Schmidt (1), Schultz (1), Pantzer (1). Again about 1813 a number of them emigrated to [[Deutsch-Wymysle (Poland)|Deutsch-Wymysle]] in [[Poland|Poland]]. In the 19th century nearly all Mennonites disappeared from this territory.
 
Jeziorka (German, <em>Kleinsee</em>) was a village near the Vistula in the district of Schwetz, former territory of Polish Prussia. Some 13 Mennonites of Dutch origin, from [[Przechovka (Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship, Poland)|Przechovka]], settled there in 1727 to cultivate the land which had been laid waste by soldiers. The Mennonite group increased in 1732 when 12 families of the territory of [[Culm (Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship, Poland)|Culm]], persecuted by the Catholic bishop of Culm, also moved to Jeziorka. Like their mother church in [[Przechovka (Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship, Poland)|Przechovka]] the Mennonite group of Jeziorka belonged to the [[Groningen Old Flemish Mennonites|Groningen Old Flemish]] branch. Apparently they never formed an independent congregation, but were in one congregation with their brethren in [[Przechovka (Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship, Poland)|Przechovka]] and [[Deutsch Konopath (Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship, Poland)|Konopath]], although a church was built in Jeziorka in 1743. They sometimes were financially supported by the Dutch Mennonite Committee of Foreign Needs at Amsterdam. Though in the land leases of 1727 and again 1767 freedom of religion was granted to them, there were many difficulties with the Roman Catholic officials. Besides this the soil was too wet for profitable agriculture. For these and other reasons some of the Mennonites in 1765 moved to [[Brenkenhoffswalde and Franztal (Lubusz Voivodeship, Poland)|Brenkenhoffswalde and Franzthal]] in Neumark. In an official list of inhabitants of Jeziorka the following family names are found: Nagtigal (4), Ratzlaw (3), Becker (2), Unrau (2), Baller (1), Fott (1), Schmidt (1), Schultz (1), Pantzer (1). Again about 1813 a number of them emigrated to [[Deutsch-Wymysle (Poland)|Deutsch-Wymysle]] in [[Poland|Poland]]. In the 19th century nearly all Mennonites disappeared from this territory.
 
 
 
= Bibliography =
 
= Bibliography =
 
Hoop Scheffer, Jacob Gijsbert de. <em>Inventaris der Archiefstukken berustende bij de Vereenigde Doopsgezinde Gemeente to Amsterdam</em>, 2 vols. Amsterdam: Uitgegeven en ten geschenke aangeboden door den Kerkeraad dier Gemeente, 1883-1884, v. I: Nos. 1091, 1601, 1607, 1702, 1713-1736.
 
Hoop Scheffer, Jacob Gijsbert de. <em>Inventaris der Archiefstukken berustende bij de Vereenigde Doopsgezinde Gemeente to Amsterdam</em>, 2 vols. Amsterdam: Uitgegeven en ten geschenke aangeboden door den Kerkeraad dier Gemeente, 1883-1884, v. I: Nos. 1091, 1601, 1607, 1702, 1713-1736.
  
 
Wiebe, Herbert. <em>Das Siedlungswerk niederändische. Mennoniten im Weichseltal . . .</em> Marburg a.d. Lahn, 1952: 30 f., 42, 45, 47, 71, note 6, 81.
 
Wiebe, Herbert. <em>Das Siedlungswerk niederändische. Mennoniten im Weichseltal . . .</em> Marburg a.d. Lahn, 1952: 30 f., 42, 45, 47, 71, note 6, 81.
 
 
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 3, p. 110|date=1957|a1_last=van der Zijpp|a1_first=Nanne|a2_last= |a2_first= }}
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 3, p. 110|date=1957|a1_last=van der Zijpp|a1_first=Nanne|a2_last= |a2_first= }}

Revision as of 19:49, 20 August 2013

Jeziorka (German, Kleinsee) was a village near the Vistula in the district of Schwetz, former territory of Polish Prussia. Some 13 Mennonites of Dutch origin, from Przechovka, settled there in 1727 to cultivate the land which had been laid waste by soldiers. The Mennonite group increased in 1732 when 12 families of the territory of Culm, persecuted by the Catholic bishop of Culm, also moved to Jeziorka. Like their mother church in Przechovka the Mennonite group of Jeziorka belonged to the Groningen Old Flemish branch. Apparently they never formed an independent congregation, but were in one congregation with their brethren in Przechovka and Konopath, although a church was built in Jeziorka in 1743. They sometimes were financially supported by the Dutch Mennonite Committee of Foreign Needs at Amsterdam. Though in the land leases of 1727 and again 1767 freedom of religion was granted to them, there were many difficulties with the Roman Catholic officials. Besides this the soil was too wet for profitable agriculture. For these and other reasons some of the Mennonites in 1765 moved to Brenkenhoffswalde and Franzthal in Neumark. In an official list of inhabitants of Jeziorka the following family names are found: Nagtigal (4), Ratzlaw (3), Becker (2), Unrau (2), Baller (1), Fott (1), Schmidt (1), Schultz (1), Pantzer (1). Again about 1813 a number of them emigrated to Deutsch-Wymysle in Poland. In the 19th century nearly all Mennonites disappeared from this territory.

Bibliography

Hoop Scheffer, Jacob Gijsbert de. Inventaris der Archiefstukken berustende bij de Vereenigde Doopsgezinde Gemeente to Amsterdam, 2 vols. Amsterdam: Uitgegeven en ten geschenke aangeboden door den Kerkeraad dier Gemeente, 1883-1884, v. I: Nos. 1091, 1601, 1607, 1702, 1713-1736.

Wiebe, Herbert. Das Siedlungswerk niederändische. Mennoniten im Weichseltal . . . Marburg a.d. Lahn, 1952: 30 f., 42, 45, 47, 71, note 6, 81.


Author(s) Nanne van der Zijpp
Date Published 1957


Cite This Article

MLA style

van der Zijpp, Nanne. "Jeziorka (Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship, Poland)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1957. Web. 27 Aug 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Jeziorka_(Kuyavian-Pomeranian_Voivodeship,_Poland)&oldid=88337.

APA style

van der Zijpp, Nanne. (1957). Jeziorka (Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship, Poland). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 27 August 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Jeziorka_(Kuyavian-Pomeranian_Voivodeship,_Poland)&oldid=88337.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 3, p. 110. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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