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The first congregation in what became the Iglesia Evangélica Menonita, Mesa Central de Mexico (Evangelical Mennonite Church of the Central Plateau of Mexico) was formed in 1959 through efforts of workers sent to the environs of Mexico City by the Franconia Mennonite Conference (MC) in 1958. The conference was organized in 1964. In 1988 there were 150 members worshiping in six centers. The church was under national leadership according to Mexican law. Training of church leaders and general Bible training for lay members has been done through an extension Bible institute giving Bible teaching in the local congregational centers and in homes. In 1988 four Americans were giving support to the local leadership.

In 1960 work was begun among the Trique Indians in the state of Oaxaca, 300 mi. (480 km.) southeast of Mexico City, including the translation of the New Testament into the Trique dialect. From slow beginnings the Trique church as grown to a membership of 200 in 1988.

[edit] Bibliography

Horsch, James E., ed. Mennonite Yearbook and Directory. Scottdale: Mennonite Publishing House (1988-89): 159.

Mennonite World Handbook Supplement. Strasbourg, France, and Lombard, IL: Mennonite World Conference, 1984: 81.

Kraybill, Paul N., ed. Mennonite World Handbook. Lombard, IL: Mennonite World Conference, 1978: 221-224.


Author(s) Reynold Sawatzky
Date Published 1988


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Sawatzky, Reynold. "Iglesia Evangélica Menonita, Mesa Central de Mexico." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1988. Web. 25 Nov 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Iglesia_Evang%C3%A9lica_Menonita,_Mesa_Central_de_Mexico&oldid=88171.

APA style

Sawatzky, Reynold. (1988). Iglesia Evangélica Menonita, Mesa Central de Mexico. Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 25 November 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Iglesia_Evang%C3%A9lica_Menonita,_Mesa_Central_de_Mexico&oldid=88171.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 5, p. 417. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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