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Heinrich IV, Duke of Saxony Source: Wikipedia
Heinrich IV der Fromme (Henry the Pious), (1473-1541), Duke of Saxony, 1539-1541, was b. 16 March 1473, the second son of Albrecht der Beherzte (Albert the Brave), (1443-1500), Duke of Saxony (founder of the Albertine branch of the Wettin family) and Sidonia of Bohemia (1449-1510). He succeeded his brother Georg as Duke of Saxony in April 1539.

Heinrich had been interested in Protestantism as early as 1529, and laid the foundation for the introduction of the Reformation in the duchy of Saxony. On 10 July 1539, he had his instructions for inspectors prepared, on the basis of Melanchthon's inspection booklet. It specified that "Anabaptists and the adherents of other sects abandon their false doctrine or leave the land."

Heinrich d. 18 August 1541 and was succeeded by his son Maurice.

[edit] Bibliography

Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. Mennonitisches Lexikon. Frankfurt & Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe; Schneider, 1913-1967: v. II, 279.

Issleib, J. "Herzog Heinrich als evangelischer Fürst." Beiträge zur sächsischen Kirchengeschichle, No. 19 (1905): 168 ff.


Author(s) Christian Hege
Richard D. Thiessen
Date Published April 2007


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Hege, Christian and Richard D. Thiessen. "Heinrich IV, Duke of Saxony (1473-1541)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. April 2007. Web. 10 Jul 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Heinrich_IV,_Duke_of_Saxony_(1473-1541)&oldid=91997.

APA style

Hege, Christian and Richard D. Thiessen. (April 2007). Heinrich IV, Duke of Saxony (1473-1541). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 10 July 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Heinrich_IV,_Duke_of_Saxony_(1473-1541)&oldid=91997.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 2, pp. 705-706. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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