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On 25 October 1607 the Flemish congregation of Harlingen, Dutch province of Friesland, wrote a letter to a number of other Flemish congregations which had elders, saying that they, like the Frisian Mennonites in their town (see Bekommerde Friezen), believed that the division of 1567 between the Flemish and the Frisians was wrong and regrettable and that peace should be made between the two groups. The answers made by the Flemish elders to this letter are not known, but in Harlingen peace was concluded in 1610, and the Flemish and Frisian congregations united. A number of Flemish elders, like Pieter Jansen Mooyer at Amsterdam and Claes Claesz of Blokzijl, welcomed the union, but others, especially Jan Luies and a number of congregations in the Dutch province of Groningen and elsewhere, condemned this "false peace" and even banned those who favored the union. For two decades the Flemish congregations in the Netherlands were stirred up by the Harlinger Vrede, which was the precursor of other unions between the divided Mennonites.

[edit] Bibliography

Hoop Scheffer, Jacob Gijsbert de. Inventaris der Archiefstukken berustende bij de Vereenigde Doopsgezinde Gemeente to Amsterdam, 2 vols. Amsterdam: Uitgegeven en ten geschenke aangeboden door den Kerkeraad dier Gemeente, 1883-1884: I, Nos. 522-523, 539, 557, 558V, 560-564, 571; II, Nos.  1232-1241, 2310.


Author(s) Nanne van der Zijpp
Date Published 1956


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Zijpp, Nanne van der. "Harlinger Vrede (Peace of Harlingen)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1956. Web. 21 Sep 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Harlinger_Vrede_(Peace_of_Harlingen)&oldid=111777.

APA style

Zijpp, Nanne van der. (1956). Harlinger Vrede (Peace of Harlingen). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 21 September 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Harlinger_Vrede_(Peace_of_Harlingen)&oldid=111777.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 2, p. 664. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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