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[[File:Hannover.jpg|300px|thumb|right|''Source: [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:New_town_hall_Hannover.jpg Wikipedia Commons] Wikipedia Commons
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[[File:Hannover.jpg|300px|thumb|right|''Source: [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:New_town_hall_Hannover.jpg Wikipedia Commons]'']]    Hannover (English, <em>Hanover</em>), the capital (population about 400,000 in 1955; 522,944 in 2007; coordinates: <span title="Latitude">52° 22′ 0″ N</span>, <span title="Longitude">9° 43′ 0″ E</span>) of the former province of Hannover and now the capital of the German federal state of [[Niedersachsen (Germany)|Lower Saxony]] (<em>Niedersachsen</em>), had about 40 Mennonites before [[World War (1914-1918)|World War I]]. In 1891 they united with the support of the <em>Vereinigung der Mennoniten im Deutschen Reich</em> to hold regular annual religious services. These were conducted by the preachers of [[Emden (Niedersachsen, Germany)|Emden]], [[Hamburg-Altona Mennonite Church (Freie und Hansestadt Hamburg, Germany)|Hamburg-Altona]], [[Leer (Niedersachsen, Germany)|Leer]], [[Norden (Ostfriesland, Germany)|Norden]], [[Krefeld (Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany)|Krefeld]], and [[Friedrichstadt (Schleswig-Holstein, Germany)|Friedrichstadt]] in the home of the merchant J. Schütt. On 8 November 1908, a committee of three was chosen (Th. Brons, W. Riewesehl, J. Schütt) to arrange for monthly services. After the death of J. Schütt (8 August 1909) the group met in the Logenhaus, Schiffgraben 8, for several years. Since 1913 there have been no services. On 8 April 1929, the annual meeting of the Curatorium of the <em>Vereinigung</em> was held in Hannover. In connection with this session a service had been held on the day before in the auditorium of the Psychological Institute, which was attended by nearly 40. The hope was expressed that regular services could again be arranged, but this was not realized until after [[World War (1939-1945) - Germany|World War II ]]when many refugees from the [[Danzig (Poland)|Danzig]] area located in this area and a meeting in Hannover was placed on the preaching circuit of the [[Göttingen (Niedersachsen, Germany)|Göttingen]] congregation.
 
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'']]    Hannover (English, <em>Hanover</em>), the capital (population about 400,000 in 1955; 522,944 in 2007; coordinates: <span title="Latitude">52° 22′ 0″ N</span>, <span title="Longitude">9° 43′ 0″ E</span>) of the former province of Hannover and now the capital of the German federal state of [[Niedersachsen (Germany)|Lower Saxony]] (<em>Niedersachsen</em>), had about 40 Mennonites before [[World War (1914-1918)|World War I]]. In 1891 they united with the support of the <em>Vereinigung der Mennoniten im Deutschen Reich</em> to hold regular annual religious services. These were conducted by the preachers of [[Emden (Niedersachsen, Germany)|Emden]], [[Hamburg-Altona Mennonite Church (Freie und Hansestadt Hamburg, Germany)|Hamburg-Altona]], [[Leer (Niedersachsen, Germany)|Leer]], [[Norden (Ostfriesland, Germany)|Norden]], [[Krefeld (Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany)|Krefeld]], and [[Friedrichstadt (Schleswig-Holstein, Germany)|Friedrichstadt]] in the home of the merchant J. Schütt. On 8 November 1908, a committee of three was chosen (Th. Brons, W. Riewesehl, J. Schütt) to arrange for monthly services. After the death of J. Schütt (8 August 1909) the group met in the Logenhaus, Schiffgraben 8, for several years. Since 1913 there have been no services. On 8 April 1929, the annual meeting of the Curatorium of the <em>Vereinigung</em> was held in Hannover. In connection with this session a service had been held on the day before in the auditorium of the Psychological Institute, which was attended by nearly 40. The hope was expressed that regular services could again be arranged, but this was not realized until after [[World War (1939-1945) - Germany|World War II]]when many refugees from the [[Danzig (Poland)|Danzig]] area located in this area and a meeting in Hannover was placed on the preaching circuit of the [[Göttingen (Niedersachsen, Germany)|Göttingen]] congregation.
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= Bibliography =
 
= Bibliography =
 
Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. Mennonitisches Lexikon, 4 vols. Frankfurt &amp; Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe; Schneider, 1913-1967: v. II, 249.
 
Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. Mennonitisches Lexikon, 4 vols. Frankfurt &amp; Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe; Schneider, 1913-1967: v. II, 249.

Revision as of 14:36, 23 August 2013

Hannover (English, Hanover), the capital (population about 400,000 in 1955; 522,944 in 2007; coordinates: 52° 22′ 0″ N, 9° 43′ 0″ E) of the former province of Hannover and now the capital of the German federal state of Lower Saxony (Niedersachsen), had about 40 Mennonites before World War I. In 1891 they united with the support of the Vereinigung der Mennoniten im Deutschen Reich to hold regular annual religious services. These were conducted by the preachers of Emden, Hamburg-Altona, Leer, Norden, Krefeld, and Friedrichstadt in the home of the merchant J. Schütt. On 8 November 1908, a committee of three was chosen (Th. Brons, W. Riewesehl, J. Schütt) to arrange for monthly services. After the death of J. Schütt (8 August 1909) the group met in the Logenhaus, Schiffgraben 8, for several years. Since 1913 there have been no services. On 8 April 1929, the annual meeting of the Curatorium of the Vereinigung was held in Hannover. In connection with this session a service had been held on the day before in the auditorium of the Psychological Institute, which was attended by nearly 40. The hope was expressed that regular services could again be arranged, but this was not realized until after World War II when many refugees from the Danzig area located in this area and a meeting in Hannover was placed on the preaching circuit of the Göttingen congregation.

Bibliography

Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. Mennonitisches Lexikon, 4 vols. Frankfurt & Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe; Schneider, 1913-1967: v. II, 249.

Mennonitische Blätter (1891), and other years, especially (1908): 96; (1929): 49.

Maps

Map:Hannover, Niedersachsen


Author(s) Christian Neff
Date Published 1956


Cite This Article

MLA style

Neff, Christian. "Hannover (Niedersachsen, Germany)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1956. Web. 28 Jul 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Hannover_(Niedersachsen,_Germany)&oldid=95075.

APA style

Neff, Christian. (1956). Hannover (Niedersachsen, Germany). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 28 July 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Hannover_(Niedersachsen,_Germany)&oldid=95075.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 2, p. 647. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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