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Grace University (first known as Grace Bible Institute, and in 1976 as Grace College of the Bible), Omaha, Nebraska, was organized for the purpose of training Christian workers in an inter-Mennonite context. The organizational meeting was held on 1 June 1943. The ten ministers in attendance included August Ewert, Albert Ewert, Albert Schultz, Peter Kliewer, Paul Kuhlmann, Harold Burkholder, John Barkman, Cornelius H. Suckau, Solomon Mouttet, and John Tieszen. The Board of Directors included leaders from six Mennonite conferences. The student body increased from 23 in 1943 to 325 by 1955. The 1955 enrollment consisted of young people from 20 denominations, 24 states, and 5 foreign countries. Sixty-five per cent of the student body was Mennonite at that time. In 2007-2008 there were 440 undergraduates enrolled from 24 states; 317 of these from Nebraska. Twenty-three denominations were represented; 17 students identified themselves as Mennonite.

The Grace Bible Institute was accredited by the Accrediting Association of Bible Institutes and Bible Colleges—Collegiate Division. It offered the degree of Bachelor of Arts with a Bible major. The liberal arts courses were fully accredited by the University of Nebraska. The Institute was classified as a professional school in that it was primarily devoted to the training of young people for full-time Christian service. Grace Bible Institute, as an inter-Mennonite school, affirmed its stand as true and loyal to the time-honored Mennonite doctrines.

Over the years Grace also expanded physically through the construction and purchase of additional facilities. These included Suckau Chapel (basement, 1949; main floor, 1957); Schmidt Hall (1962); Harold D. Burkholder Center (1967) which includes the Jim Classen Gymnasium (2003); and the Donald J. Tschetter Academic Building (1975). In 1977, Grace purchased the St. Catherine’s Hospital Center for Continuing Care, adding building used for dorms and administrative purposes. In 2003 a gymnasium as was added.

In 1995 Grace Bible Institute became Grace University with three colleges: Grace College of the Bible, Grace College of Graduate Studies, and Grace College of Continuing Education.

Contents

Bibliography

Grace University. "Grace University History." Web. 15 April 2008. <http://www.graceu.edu/Catalog/GeneralInfo/Mission.htm>

Grace University. "Statistical Information." Web. 15 April 2008. <http://www.graceu.edu/Catalog/Directories/StatsInfo.htm>

Wikipedia. "Grace University." 22 March 2012. Web. 22 June 2012. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grace_University.

Additional Information

Presidents of Grace

President Years
Paul Kuhlmann (acting) 1943
Cornelius H. Suckau 1944-1950
Harold D. Burkholder 1950-1955
Joseph W. Schmidt 1955-1960
D. J. Unruh (interim) 1960-1961
Waldo E. Harder 1961-1971
Robert W. Benton 1971-1984
Warren E. Bathke 1984-1993
Neal F. McBride 1993-1997
James P. Eckman 1997-2012
David M. Barnes 2012-present


Author(s) Harold D. Burkholder
Sam Steiner
Date Published June 2012


Cite This Article

MLA style

Burkholder, Harold D. and Sam Steiner. "Grace University (Omaha, Nebraska, USA)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. June 2012. Web. 23 Jul 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Grace_University_(Omaha,_Nebraska,_USA)&oldid=81371.

APA style

Burkholder, Harold D. and Sam Steiner. (June 2012). Grace University (Omaha, Nebraska, USA). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 23 July 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Grace_University_(Omaha,_Nebraska,_USA)&oldid=81371.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 2, pp. 559-560. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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