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In 1945, through the outreach of Canada Inland Mission, Peter Schroeder accepted the responsibility of ministering to the Russian people of Grand Forks, British Columbia through personal contact and the distribution of Christian literature.  Three years later, Peter became aware that if a permanent ministry were to be established, he would require assistance. The year 1947 witnessed many itinerant speakers working in the region, including K. P. Janzen, Abram Huebert, and Jacob Reimer.  Notwithstanding this help, Peter quickly became aware that such an arrangement could not facilitate regular, continuous services.  Consequently, Peter invited George Martens and his family to aid in establishing a more consistent ministry in Grand Forks, an invitation which they accepted.

By 1954, the Martens' home was not suitable for conducting Sunday School classes, and on 25 September 1954 construction began on a new church building that could accommodate the seventy people that were already a part of the congregation plus room for growth.  The building was completed and dedicated on 27 November 1955, and its sanctuary could seat 120 people.  Pines Bible Camp was established in 1965 as an agency for outreach in the region.

Always perceived as a "community church" with no official denominational affiliation, Gospel Chapel Fellowship joined the British Columbia Conference of Mennonite Brethren Churches in 1976.  Either expansion or a new building seemed necessary by 1977 when attendance growth called for more room.  After much prayer, it was agreed that expansion was the best route, and a new sanctuary with a basement was added onto the existing structure.  The new sanctuary, dedicated on 4 June 1978, was able to seat three hundred people.  After thirty-four years of service to the congregation, Pastor George Martens retired in 1982. 1993 witnessed another building project, as the existing structure experienced further expansion.

In 2010 the congregation had 126 members and an average attendance of 242.

Contents

Bibliography

Centre for Mennonite Studies. "Gospel Chapel Fellowship."  http://www.mbconf.ca/home/products_and_services/resources/published_genealogies/mb_provincial_conferences_and_church_congregation_records/british_columbia_archives/gospel_chapel_fellowship_archives/ (accessed 30 November 2009).

Mennonite Brethren Herald (3 December 1982): 16; (27 May 1988): 31; (16 July 1993): 19.

Schmidt, Ben. Unpublished history, 5 pp. Mennonite Historical Society of Canada collection, Mennonite Archives of Ontario.

Archival Records:

Centre for Mennonite Brethren Studies (Winnipeg, MB): Volume 368.

Additional Information

Mailing address: Box 2528, Grand Forks, BC, V0H 1H0.

Location: 7048 Donaldson Drive, Grand Forks, BC.

Telephone: 250-442-5148.

Website: Gospel Chapel

Denominational Affiliations:

British Columbia Conference of the Mennonite Brethren Church (1976-present)

Canadian Conference of Mennonite Brethren Churches (1976-present)

Gospel Chapel Fellowship Leading Ministers

Minister Years
Peter Schroeder 1945-1948
George Martens 1948-1982
Rey Nickel 1982-1995
Russ Reid 1995
Henry P. Klassen 1997-present

Gospel Chapel Fellowship Membership

Year Members
1975 30
1981 30
1985 53
1990 77
1995 121
2000 124
2005 139
2010 126

Maps

Map:Gospel Chapel Fellowship, Grand Forks, BC


Author(s) Andrew Klager
Date Published November 2010


Cite This Article

MLA style

Klager, Andrew. "Gospel Chapel Fellowship (Grand Forks, British Columbia, Canada)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. November 2010. Web. 22 Aug 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Gospel_Chapel_Fellowship_(Grand_Forks,_British_Columbia,_Canada)&oldid=87879.

APA style

Klager, Andrew. (November 2010). Gospel Chapel Fellowship (Grand Forks, British Columbia, Canada). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 22 August 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Gospel_Chapel_Fellowship_(Grand_Forks,_British_Columbia,_Canada)&oldid=87879.




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