From GAMEO
Revision as of 14:02, 23 August 2013 by GameoAdmin (Talk | contribs)


Jump to: navigation, search

Gormley Missionary Church began as a New Mennonite preaching appointment in the late 1860s or early 1870s under the leadership of Abraham Raymer and John Steckley, who were associated with Daniel Hoch, founder of  the New Mennonites. Raymer had been active in the Markham area as an independent Mennonite minister before 1860, and John Steckley began preaching about 1861. The New Mennonites likely met in homes and schoolhouses during the first years.

There was a division in the church in 1908 when the pastor John Ball and a number of families left because the Mennonite Brethren in Christ did not favor the baptism of the Holy Spirit resulting in speaking in tongues. John Ball became a minister in the emerging Pentecostal Assemblies of Canada.

The first building was erected on Stouffville Road in 1873. The New Mennonites, through a series of mergers, were part of the Mennonite Brethren in Christ denomination in 1883 that remained known by that name until 1947. Currently the denomination is the Evangelical Missionary Church of Canada. The original wood frame building was replaced with a brick one in 1931. A major extension which added a fellowship hall, offices, nursery, and foyer was dedicated in 1966.

In 1950 there were 133 members; in 1975, 124; in 1985, 101; in 1995, 90. The congregation has been affiliated with the Mennonite Brethren in Christ, its predecessors and successors since its founding.

Contents

Bibliography

Gormley Missionary Church."Our Story." http://www.gormleychurch.org/about/story.html (accessed 15 August 2009).

Steiner, Sam. "Assurance of Salvation or Faithful Living: Nineteenth Century Ontario Mennonites Engage Pietism." Unpublished paper, 2008.

The Word for 100 years, 1873-1973. Gormley: The Church, 1973.

Additional Information

Address: 120 Gormley Road West, Richmond Hill, Ontario

Phone: 905-887-5846

Website: Gormley Missionary Church

Denominational Affiliation: Evangelical Missionary Church of Canada

Gormley Missionary Church Pastors

Minister Years
Abraham Raymer  
Joseph Raymer 1878-1879
John Steckley  
Noah Detwiler  
Menno Bowman  
Peter Cober 1885-1888
Henry Goudie 1889-1892
David Shantz 1892-1894
Henry Wismer 1894-1997
A. B. Musselman 1897-1899
Solomon Eby 1899-1901
Silas Cressman 1901-1904
J. E. Fidler 1904-1907
John Ball 1907-1908
Isaac Pike Until 1908

Conference

C. N. Good 1908-1911
E. Sievenpiper 1911-1915
Milton Bricker 1915-1918
R. Eltherington 1918-1922
Willam Yates 1922-1926
C. T. Sinden 1926-1929
Henry Goudie 1929
A. T. Gooding 1929-1934
Gormley/Bethesda

Separate Charge

 
Herb Shantz 1934-1938
Isaac Brubacher 1938-1942
Ward M. Shantz 1942-1943
Frank Huson 1943-1947
Percy R. Barley 1947-1949
Lloyd K. Sider 1949-1952
Clarence E. Hunking 1952-1963
Gormley/Bethesda

Joined

 
Lloyd K. Sider 1963-1968
Harvey Hallman 1968-1971
Eldon Boettger 1971-1975
Cecil Rosenberger 1975-1980
Edwin Sparks 1980-1987
Peter Gibbins 1987-1990
Tim Soukup 1990-1998
Brian Waugh 1999-2004
Craig Arbon 2004-

Maps

Map:Gormley Missionary Church (Richmond Hill, Ontario)


Author(s) Everek R. Storms
Sam Steiner
Date Published August 2009


Cite This Article

MLA style

Storms, Everek R. and Sam Steiner. "Gormley Missionary Church (Richmond Hill, Ontario, Canada)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. August 2009. Web. 25 Dec 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Gormley_Missionary_Church_(Richmond_Hill,_Ontario,_Canada)&oldid=91937.

APA style

Storms, Everek R. and Sam Steiner. (August 2009). Gormley Missionary Church (Richmond Hill, Ontario, Canada). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 25 December 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Gormley_Missionary_Church_(Richmond_Hill,_Ontario,_Canada)&oldid=91937.




Hpbuttns.gif
Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 2, pp. 543-544. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


©1996-2014 by the Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. All rights reserved.