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Tijs (or Thijs) Gerrits (d. 15 December 1601) was one of the outstanding leaders of the Harde (Strict) Frisian Mennonites in the Netherlands, who separated in 1589 from the Zachte (Mild) Frisians (under the leadership of Lubbert Gerritsz. In 1587 he was a preacher at Hoorn, later elder at Medemblik. He originated the expression, "Shall we allow ourselves to be governed by the congregation?" He accompanied Elder Jan Jacobsz on his journeys to the North Sea islands and to Groningen. In 1599 when a quarrel arose among these strict Frisians between Jan Jacobsz and Pieter Jeltjes, Tijs Gerrits took the side of the Jan Jacobsgezinden. But about 1601 a new quarrel within the Jan-Jacobsgezinden group caused Tijs Gerrits and his adherents to separate from Jan Jacobsz and his followers. Gerrits's followers were called the T(h)ijs-Gerritsvolk.

Bibliography

Doopsgezinde Bijdragen (1876): 30; (1893): 80 f.

Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. Mennonitisches Lexikon. Frankfurt & Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe: Schneider, 1913-1967: v. II, 84.

Hoop Scheffer, Jacob Gijsbert de. Inventaris der Archiefstukken berustende bij de Vereenigde Doopsgezinde Gemeente to Amsterdam. 2 v. Amsterdam: Uitgegeven en ten geschenke aangeboden door den Kerkeraad dier Gemeente, 1883-1884: I, 478.

Loosjes, J. "Jan Jacobsz en de Jan-Jacobsgezinden." Nederlands Archief vor Kerkgeschiedenis 11 (1914): 189 f.


Author(s) Karel Vos
Date Published 1956


Cite This Article

MLA style

Vos, Karel. "Gerrits, Tijs (d. 1601)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1956. Web. 19 Sep 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Gerrits,_Tijs_(d._1601)&oldid=91915.

APA style

Vos, Karel. (1956). Gerrits, Tijs (d. 1601). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 19 September 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Gerrits,_Tijs_(d._1601)&oldid=91915.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 2, p. 505. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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