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General Conference Central Office (General Conference Mennonite Church) was located in two adjacent buildings, 720 and 722 Main Street, Newton, Kansas, sometimes referred to as General Conference Headquarters. Donated by Elva Krehbiel Leisy of Dallas, Texas, in memory of her parents, Henry P. and Matilda Kruse Krehbiel, the 722 building was dedicated as the Krehbiel Building and put into service on 18 July 1943, as the Central Office of the General Conference Mennonite Church. In 1954 Mrs. Leisy made the adjacent building available on an annuity agreement basis. The building was remodeled and enlarged in 1951, 1954, and 1957. In addition to offices for the Boards of the General Conference, the Central Office provided space for the Central Treasury, Young People's Union, Women's Missionary Association, Mennonite Publication Office and Bookstore, and the Western District Conference. The office was supervised by a manager appointed by the Executive Committee of the General Conference Mennonite Church. Persons who had served as managers are P. A. Penner 1943-1946, Walter H. Dyck 1946-1949, A. Theodore Mueller 1949-1950, A. J. Richert 1952-1958, William L. Friesen 1959-


Author(s) Maynard Shelly
Date Published 1959


Cite This Article

MLA style

Shelly, Maynard. "General Conference Central Office (Newton, Kansas, USA)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1959. Web. 11 Jul 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=General_Conference_Central_Office_(Newton,_Kansas,_USA)&oldid=81119.

APA style

Shelly, Maynard. (1959). General Conference Central Office (Newton, Kansas, USA). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 11 July 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=General_Conference_Central_Office_(Newton,_Kansas,_USA)&oldid=81119.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 4, p. 1086. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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