From GAMEO
Revision as of 19:46, 20 August 2013 by GameoAdmin (Talk | contribs)

(diff) ← Older revision | Latest revision (diff) | Newer revision → (diff)

Jump to: navigation, search

The Westheimer Mennonite Church congregation at Gem, Alberta began services in 1929. The first building was occupied in 1947. Dan Janzen is considered the founding leader of the group. The congregation originated through immigration from the Soviet Union.

The congregation worshiped with the Mennonite Brethren until 1931 when the latter built a church. Gem was a daughter congregation of the Westheimer Mennonite Church (GC) church in Rosemary. It became independent from the Rosemary congregation in 1957 with 51 members and became known as Gem Mennonite Church. By 1966 the declining membership and difficulties in getting ministerial assistance were threatening the survival of the church. The last recorded minutes are from a meeting on September 1967, at which only 9 people were present. The congregation dissolved later that year.

Contents

Bibliography

Dick, C. L. The Mennonite Conference of Alberta: A History of its Churches and Institutions. Edmonton: The Mennonite Conference of Alberta, 1981, 147 pp.

Mennonite Reporter (26 November 1990): B3.

Additional Information

Denominational Affiliations:

Conference of Mennonites in Alberta

Conference of Mennonites in Canada (1958-67)

General Conference Mennonite Church.

Gem Mennonite Church Membership

Year Members
1957 51
1965 39


Author(s) Marlene Epp
Date Published January 2010


Cite This Article

MLA style

Epp, Marlene. "Gem Mennonite Church (Gem, Alberta, Canada)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. January 2010. Web. 28 Nov 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Gem_Mennonite_Church_(Gem,_Alberta,_Canada)&oldid=87738.

APA style

Epp, Marlene. (January 2010). Gem Mennonite Church (Gem, Alberta, Canada). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 28 November 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Gem_Mennonite_Church_(Gem,_Alberta,_Canada)&oldid=87738.




©1996-2014 by the Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. All rights reserved.