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Gätte (Gäta and Göda; now Kúty) in Slovakia (formerly Hungary) near the Delta of the Thaya (Dyje) and the March (Morava), was in the 16th century a part of the Holitsch domain. In the great persecution of 1550, say the chronicles, there was in Gätte in Hungary a Bruderhof with 150 children, also many sick, lame, and blind. But they were ordered to leave the estates of Berthold von Lipa, and wandered about at the mercy of the populace. In 1552 four deacons were confirmed at Gätte. Then the Bruderhof is not mentioned until 70 years later. On 15 April 1627 Croatian horsemen from Moravia plundered it.

Bibliography

Beck, Josef. Die Geschichts-Bücher der Wiedertäufer in Oesterreich-Ungarn. Vienna, 1883; reprinted Nieuwkoop: De Graaf, 1967.

Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. Mennonitisches Lexikon, 4 vols. Frankfurt & Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe: Schneider, 1913-1967: v. II, 36.

Wolkan, Rudolf. Geschicht-Buch der Hutterischen Brüder. Macleod, AB, and Vienna, 1923: 241, 249 f., 208, 606.

Zieglschmid, A. J. F. Die älteste Chronik der Hutterischen Brüder: Ein Sprachdenkmal aus frühneuhochdeutscher Zeit. Ithaca: Cayuga Press, 1943: 319, 331, 341, 808.


Author(s) Johann Loserth
Date Published 1956


Cite This Article

MLA style

Loserth, Johann. "Gätte (Trnavský kraj, Slovakia)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1956. Web. 18 Dec 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=G%C3%A4tte_(Trnavsk%C3%BD_kraj,_Slovakia)&oldid=105572.

APA style

Loserth, Johann. (1956). Gätte (Trnavský kraj, Slovakia). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 18 December 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=G%C3%A4tte_(Trnavsk%C3%BD_kraj,_Slovakia)&oldid=105572.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 2, p. 440. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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