From GAMEO
Jump to: navigation, search
Frederik II, King of Denmark Source: Wikipedia
Frederik II (Frederick), King of Denmark and Norway, 1559-1588, was born 1 July 1534, son of King Christian III of Denmark and Norway (1503-1559) and Dorothea of Saxe-Lauenburg (1511-1571). He succeeded his father as king in 1559, and upon his death was succeeded by his eldest son, Christian IV (1577-1648).

Dutch emigrants, including Mennonites, Davidjorists, and Sacramentists, repeatedly came to Holstein, Schleswig, and Denmark. At the urging of the clergy the king took steps to prevent their growth; in 1558 against Johann Knijpmark and his companions in Krempe, and 20 September 1569, by an edict of 25 articles which were to be signed by foreigners before they were given permission to settle to prevent perversion of doctrine and schism. In 1574 Frederik ordered the provost Johann Vorstius at Itzehoe to examine all the Dutch residents of the Wilstermarsch, as they were suspected of Davidjorism. A preacher Andreas had to surrender his books and promised to reform, and was therefore permitted to keep his property.


Author(s) R. Hansen
Richard D. Thiessen
Date Published April 2007


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Hansen, R. and Richard D. Thiessen. "Frederik II, King of Denmark and Norway (1534-1588)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. April 2007. Web. 24 Apr 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Frederik_II,_King_of_Denmark_and_Norway_(1534-1588)&oldid=91796.

APA style

Hansen, R. and Richard D. Thiessen. (April 2007). Frederik II, King of Denmark and Norway (1534-1588). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 24 April 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Frederik_II,_King_of_Denmark_and_Norway_(1534-1588)&oldid=91796.




Hpbuttns.gif
Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 2, p. 382. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


©1996-2014 by the Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. All rights reserved.