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Evidence suggests that Andreas Fischer was born ca. 1480 in Bohemia and was educated at the University of Vienna. He was likely baptized by Hans Hut or Oswald Glait, and appears with Glait in Silesia in 1528 as a leader and spokesperson for the Sabbatarian Anabaptists there.

Between 1529 and 1532, Fischer worked as a missionary in Slovakia and had some success among the miners there. He narrowly escaped execution; his wife was drowned. He moved to the Nikolsburg area about 1532 and assumed the position of leadership among the Schwertler faction that had been left vacant by the exit to Prussia of Hans Spittelmayr. The Hutterite Chronicle reports that this group soon became known as "Sabbatarians."

After 1535, Fischer fled to the border region between Saxony and Bohemia to escape persecution. He returned to Moravia about 1537 and to Slovakia in 1540 where was was arrested and executed.

Bibliography

Liechty, Daniel. Andreas Fischer and Sabbatarian Anabaptism: an Early Reformation Episode in East Central Europe. Scottdale, PA: Herald Press, 1988.

Mennonite Quarterly Review 58 (1984): 125-132.


Author(s) Daniel Liechty
Date Published 1989


Cite This Article

MLA style

Liechty, Daniel. "Fischer, Andreas (ca. 1480-1540)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1989. Web. 18 Sep 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Fischer,_Andreas_(ca._1480-1540)&oldid=91773.

APA style

Liechty, Daniel. (1989). Fischer, Andreas (ca. 1480-1540). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 18 September 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Fischer,_Andreas_(ca._1480-1540)&oldid=91773.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 5, p. 299. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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