Difference between revisions of "First Mennonite Church (Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada)"

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[[File:FMC%20Saskatoon.JPG|300px|thumb|right|''First Mennonite Church, Saskatoon, SK
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[[File:FMC%20Saskatoon.JPG|400px|thumb|right|''First Mennonite Church, Saskatoon, SK<br />
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Source: [http://www.mcsask.ca/churches/first.htm Mennonite Church Saskatchewan website]'']]
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Saskatoon First Mennonite Church had its beginning with the coming of the Mennonites from the [[Union of Soviet Socialist Republics|Soviet Union]] after World War I. Mennonites who settled in [[Saskatoon (Saskatchewan, Canada)|Saskatoon]] were at first served occasionally by visiting ministers and students at the university beginning in 1924. It began primarily as an urban mission, specifically a [[Mennonite Girls' Home (Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada)|Mennonite Girls' Home]] for young women working in the city. The first English Sunday School class began in 1936. In 1930 [[Thiessen, Jacob Johann "J. J." (1893-1977)|Jacob John "J. J." Thiessen]] was stationed here by the [[Home Mission Board (General Conference Mennonite Church)|Home Mission Board]]. In 1932 a congregation was organized as a branch of the [[Rosenort Mennonite Church Group (Saskatchewan, Canada)|Rosenort Mennonite Church of Saskatchewan]] and Thiessen was ordained as minister. A new church was dedicated on 18 October 1936, with subsequent building programs in 1957 and 1990. In 1937 the congregation was reorganized as an independent church, and in 1938 Thiessen was ordained as its elder.
  
Source: [http://www.mcsask.ca/churches/first.htm Mennonite Church Saskatchewan website]'']]        [[File:94-14.538.jpg|300px|thumb|right|''J.J. Thiessen (seated) and  N.W. Dick
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The congregation began the [[Pleasant Hill Mennonite Church (Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada)|Pleasant Hill]] and Mayfair mission centers; the latter became first known as the Mayfair Mennonite Mission Church and later as [[Cornerstone Church (Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada)|Cornerstone Church]].
  
were pastors at First Mennonite in 1960.
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The language of worship is English and German; the transition from German occurred in the 1950s.
 
 
Canadian Mennonite photo.
 
 
 
'']]    Saskatoon First Mennonite Church had its beginning with the coming of the Mennonites from the [[Union of Soviet Socialist Republics|Soviet Union]] after World War I. Mennonites who settled in [[Saskatoon (Saskatchewan, Canada)|Saskatoon]] were at first served occasionally by visiting ministers and students at the university beginning in 1924. It began primarily as an urban mission, specifically a [[Mennonite Girls' Home (Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada)|Mennonite Girls' Home]] for young women working in the city. The first English Sunday School class began in 1936. In 1930 [[Thiessen, Jacob Johann "J. J." (1893-1977)|Jacob John "J. J." Thiessen]] was stationed here by the [[Home Mission Board (General Conference Mennonite Church)|Home Mission Board]]. In 1932 a congregation was organized as a branch of the Rosenort Mennonite Church of Saskatchewan and Thiessen was ordained as minister. A new church was dedicated on 18 October 1936, with subsequent building programs in 1957 and 1990. In 1937 the congregation was reorganized as an independent church, and in 1938 Thiessen was ordained as its elder. The congregation began the [[Pleasant Hill Mennonite Church (Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada)|Pleasant Hill]] and Mayfair mission centers; the latter became first known as the Mayfair Mennonite Mission Church and later as [[Cornerstone Church (Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada)|Cornerstone Church]]. The language of worship is English and German; the transition from German occurred in the 1950s.
 
 
= Bibliography =
 
= Bibliography =
 
Dyck, John H. and Alvin P. Schellenberg, eds., <em class="gameo_bibliography">First Mennonite Church, Queen St. and Fifth Avenue, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.</em> Saskatoon, Sask.: First Mennonite Church, 1973, 74 pp.
 
Dyck, John H. and Alvin P. Schellenberg, eds., <em class="gameo_bibliography">First Mennonite Church, Queen St. and Fifth Avenue, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.</em> Saskatoon, Sask.: First Mennonite Church, 1973, 74 pp.
Line 15: Line 15:
 
Krahn,  Kim. "Anatomy of an Upheaval." Research paper, Canadian Mennonite Bible College, 1985. [http://www.mennonitechurch.ca/programs/archives/index.htm  Mennonite Heritage Centre].
 
Krahn,  Kim. "Anatomy of an Upheaval." Research paper, Canadian Mennonite Bible College, 1985. [http://www.mennonitechurch.ca/programs/archives/index.htm  Mennonite Heritage Centre].
  
<em class="gameo_bibliography">Mennonite Reporter</em> (19 April 1982): 11; (21 September 1992): B3; (5 September 1994): 2; (3 October 1994): 12.
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''Mennonite Reporter'' (19 April 1982): 11; (21 September 1992): B3; (5 September 1994): 2; (3 October 1994): 12.
  
 
Patkau, Esther. "J.J. Thiessen's Ministry in Saskatoon." M.Div thesis, Saskatoon Lutheran Theological Seminary, 1979, 252 pp.
 
Patkau, Esther. "J.J. Thiessen's Ministry in Saskatoon." M.Div thesis, Saskatoon Lutheran Theological Seminary, 1979, 252 pp.
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Patkau, Esther. <em class="gameo_bibliography">First Mennonite Church in Saskatoon, 1923-1982. </em>Saskatoon, Sask.: First Mennonite Church, 1982, 319 pp.
 
Patkau, Esther. <em class="gameo_bibliography">First Mennonite Church in Saskatoon, 1923-1982. </em>Saskatoon, Sask.: First Mennonite Church, 1982, 319 pp.
  
<h3>Archival Records:</h3> Church records at  [http://www.mennonitechurch.ca/programs/archives/index.htm  Mennonite Heritage Centre].
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<h3>Archival Records</h3>
 +
Church records at  [http://www.mennonitechurch.ca/programs/archives/index.htm  Mennonite Heritage Centre].
 
= Additional Information =
 
= Additional Information =
<strong>Location</strong>: 418 Queen St., Saskatoon, SK  S7K 0M3
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'''Location''': 418 Queen St., Saskatoon, SK  S7K 0M3
  
<strong>Telephone</strong>: 306-244-6772
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'''Telephone''': 306-244-6772
  
<strong>Website</strong>: [http://www.mcsask.ca/churches/first.htm First Mennonite Church]
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'''Website''': [http://www.mcsask.ca/churches/first.htm First Mennonite Church]
  
<strong>Denominational Affiliations</strong>:
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'''Denominational Affiliations''':
  
 
[[Mennonite Church Saskatchewan|Mennonite Church Saskatchewan]] (1959-present)
 
[[Mennonite Church Saskatchewan|Mennonite Church Saskatchewan]] (1959-present)
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[[General Conference Mennonite Church (GCM)|General Conference Mennonite Church]] (1938-1999)
 
[[General Conference Mennonite Church (GCM)|General Conference Mennonite Church]] (1938-1999)
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[[File:94-14.538.jpg|300px|thumb|right|''J.J. Thiessen (seated) and  N.W. Dick were pastors at First Mennonite in 1960.<br>
 +
Source: Canadian Mennonite photo.'']]
  
<h3>First Mennonite Church Ministers</h3> <table class="plain"> <tr> <th>Minister
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=== First Mennonite Church Ministers ===
 
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{| border="1"
</th> <th>Years
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|-
 
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!Minister
</th> </tr>  <tr> <td>[[Thiessen, Jacob Johann "J. J." (1893-1977)|J. J. Thiessen]]</td> <td align="right">1930-1977</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Jakob Gerbrandt</td> <td align="right">1947-1971</td> </tr> <tr> <td>David Penner</td> <td align="right">1951-1962</td> </tr> <tr> <td> N. N. Dick</td> <td align="right">1959-1961</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Gerhard Wiens</td> <td align="right">1960-1969
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!Years
 
+
|-
</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Abram Martens</td> <td align="right">1962-1978</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Menno Nickel</td> <td align="right">1965-1971</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Abram Warkentin
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|[[Thiessen, Jacob Johann "J. J." (1893-1977)|J. J. Thiessen]]
 
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|1930-1977
</td> <td align="right">1966-1978</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Edward Enns
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|-
 
+
|Jakob Gerbrandt
</td> <td align="right">1963-1971</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Henry Wiens
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|1947-1971
 
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|-
</td> <td align="right">1971-1983</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Henry Reimer
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|David Penner
 
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|1951-1962
</td> <td align="right">1984-1994</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Arnie Fehderau
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|-
 
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| N. N. Dick
</td> <td align="right">1996-present</td> </tr>  </table> <h3>First Mennonite Church Membership</h3> <table class="plain"> <tr> <th>Year
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|1959-1961
 
+
|-
</th> <th>Members
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|Gerhard Wiens
 
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|1960-1969
</th> </tr>  <tr> <td>1950</td> <td align="right">288
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|-
 
+
|Abram Martens
</td> </tr> <tr> <td>1957
+
|1962-1978
 
+
|-
</td> <td align="right">348
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|Menno Nickel
 
+
|1965-1971
</td> </tr> <tr> <td>1965
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|-
 
+
|Abram Warkentin
</td> <td align="right">505
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|1966-1978
 
+
|-
</td> </tr> <tr> <td>1975
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|Edward Enns
 
+
|1963-1971
</td> <td align="right">434
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|-
 
+
|Henry Wiens
</td> </tr> <tr> <td>1985
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|1971-1983
 
+
|-
</td> <td align="right">369
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|Henry Reimer
 
+
|1984-1994
</td> </tr> <tr> <td>1995
+
|-
 
+
|Arnie Fehderau
</td> <td align="right">253
+
|1996-2014
 
+
|}
</td> </tr> <tr> <td>2000
+
=== First Mennonite Church Membership ===
 
+
{| class="wikitable" style="text-align: right;"
</td> <td align="right">218
+
|-
 
+
!Year
</td> </tr> <tr> <td>2005
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!Members
 
+
|-
</td> <td align="right">202
+
|1950
 
+
|288
</td> </tr> <tr> <td>2010
+
|-
 
+
|1957
</td> <td align="right">162
+
|348
 
+
|-
</td> </tr>  </table>
+
|1965
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 4, p. 427|date=July 2010|a1_last=Thiessen|a1_first=Jacob J. |a2_last=Epp|a2_first=Marlene}}
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|505
 +
|-
 +
|1975
 +
|434
 +
|-
 +
|1985
 +
|369
 +
|-
 +
|1995
 +
|253
 +
|-
 +
|2000
 +
|218
 +
|-
 +
|2005
 +
|202
 +
|-
 +
|2010
 +
|162
 +
|}
 +
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 4, p. 427|date=October 2014|a1_last=Thiessen|a1_first=Jacob J. |a2_last=Epp|a2_first=Marlene}}
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[[Category:Churches]]
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[[Category:Canadian Congregations]]
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[[Category:Saskatchewan Congregations]]
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[[Category:Mennonite Church Canada Congregations]]
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[[Category:Mennonite Church Saskatchewan Congregations]]
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[[Category:General Conference Mennonite Church Congregations]]

Latest revision as of 21:38, 1 January 2017

First Mennonite Church, Saskatoon, SK
Source: Mennonite Church Saskatchewan website

Saskatoon First Mennonite Church had its beginning with the coming of the Mennonites from the Soviet Union after World War I. Mennonites who settled in Saskatoon were at first served occasionally by visiting ministers and students at the university beginning in 1924. It began primarily as an urban mission, specifically a Mennonite Girls' Home for young women working in the city. The first English Sunday School class began in 1936. In 1930 Jacob John "J. J." Thiessen was stationed here by the Home Mission Board. In 1932 a congregation was organized as a branch of the Rosenort Mennonite Church of Saskatchewan and Thiessen was ordained as minister. A new church was dedicated on 18 October 1936, with subsequent building programs in 1957 and 1990. In 1937 the congregation was reorganized as an independent church, and in 1938 Thiessen was ordained as its elder.

The congregation began the Pleasant Hill and Mayfair mission centers; the latter became first known as the Mayfair Mennonite Mission Church and later as Cornerstone Church.

The language of worship is English and German; the transition from German occurred in the 1950s.

Bibliography

Dyck, John H. and Alvin P. Schellenberg, eds., First Mennonite Church, Queen St. and Fifth Avenue, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. Saskatoon, Sask.: First Mennonite Church, 1973, 74 pp.

Ens, Marg. "History of the First Mennonite Church in Saskatoon." Research paper, Canadian Mennonite Bible College, 1958, 9 pp. Mennonite Heritage Centre.

Krahn,  Kim. "Anatomy of an Upheaval." Research paper, Canadian Mennonite Bible College, 1985. Mennonite Heritage Centre.

Mennonite Reporter (19 April 1982): 11; (21 September 1992): B3; (5 September 1994): 2; (3 October 1994): 12.

Patkau, Esther. "J.J. Thiessen's Ministry in Saskatoon." M.Div thesis, Saskatoon Lutheran Theological Seminary, 1979, 252 pp.

Patkau, Esther. First Mennonite Church in Saskatoon, 1923-1982. Saskatoon, Sask.: First Mennonite Church, 1982, 319 pp.

Archival Records

Church records at  Mennonite Heritage Centre.

Additional Information

Location: 418 Queen St., Saskatoon, SK  S7K 0M3

Telephone: 306-244-6772

Website: First Mennonite Church

Denominational Affiliations:

Mennonite Church Saskatchewan (1959-present)

Conference of Mennonites in Canada / Mennonite Church Canada (1938-present)

General Conference Mennonite Church (1938-1999)

J.J. Thiessen (seated) and  N.W. Dick were pastors at First Mennonite in 1960.
Source: Canadian Mennonite photo.

First Mennonite Church Ministers

Minister Years
J. J. Thiessen 1930-1977
Jakob Gerbrandt 1947-1971
David Penner 1951-1962
N. N. Dick 1959-1961
Gerhard Wiens 1960-1969
Abram Martens 1962-1978
Menno Nickel 1965-1971
Abram Warkentin 1966-1978
Edward Enns 1963-1971
Henry Wiens 1971-1983
Henry Reimer 1984-1994
Arnie Fehderau 1996-2014

First Mennonite Church Membership

Year Members
1950 288
1957 348
1965 505
1975 434
1985 369
1995 253
2000 218
2005 202
2010 162


Author(s) Jacob J. Thiessen
Marlene Epp
Date Published October 2014


Cite This Article

MLA style

Thiessen, Jacob J. and Marlene Epp. "First Mennonite Church (Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. October 2014. Web. 12 Dec 2017. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=First_Mennonite_Church_(Saskatoon,_Saskatchewan,_Canada)&oldid=141992.

APA style

Thiessen, Jacob J. and Marlene Epp. (October 2014). First Mennonite Church (Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 12 December 2017, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=First_Mennonite_Church_(Saskatoon,_Saskatchewan,_Canada)&oldid=141992.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 4, p. 427. All rights reserved.


©1996-2017 by the Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. All rights reserved.