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Fairview Old Order Mennonite Church, located in Lebanon County, Pennsylvania, was started in 1915, when a group who had settled experimentally in Osceola County, Iowa, came to Lebanon County. They worshiped in a schoolhouse, and John A. Weaver of the Pike Mennonite Church, Hinkletown, Pennsylvania, preached the first sermon. In 1917 they entered larger quarters two miles north of Myerstown. On 1 January 1928 most of this group joined the Old Order Mennonites, with Moses Horning as bishop. Since the price of land in Lancaster County was very high, the Old Order Mennonite (Martinites) congregation in Lebanon County increased in numbers. Beginning in January 1938 they rented the Royer Brethren Church, and in the summer of 1943 built a commodious brick meetinghouse two miles south of Myerstown. Milo Lehman was ordained to the ministry on 1 June 1944, and Aaron Horning on 1December 1954. Joseph Hostetter had the bishop charge. The membership in 1954 was 250.


Author(s) Ira D Landis
Date Published 1956


Cite This Article

MLA style

Landis, Ira D. "Fairview Old Order Mennonite Church (Myerstown, Pennsylvania, USA)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1956. Web. 20 Aug 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Fairview_Old_Order_Mennonite_Church_(Myerstown,_Pennsylvania,_USA)&oldid=100443.

APA style

Landis, Ira D. (1956). Fairview Old Order Mennonite Church (Myerstown, Pennsylvania, USA). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 20 August 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Fairview_Old_Order_Mennonite_Church_(Myerstown,_Pennsylvania,_USA)&oldid=100443.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 2, p. 290. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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