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Emmanuel Mennonite Church. Photos by Victor Wiebe. 
Emmanuel Mennonite Church. Photos by Victor Wiebe. 
Langham, Saskatchewan. Located 11 1/2 miles southeast of Langham. In 1955 there were 50 members; in 1965, 19. The congregation dissolved about 1972. It had been affiliated with the Krimmer Mennonite Brethren, the Saskatchewan Conference of Mennonite Brethren Churches (1960-1972), Canadian Conference of Mennonite Brethren Churches (1960-1972) and General Conference of Mennonite Brethren Churches (1960-1972). The language of worship was English.

The congregation began services in 1901. The first building was occupied in 1917. A. Stahl is considered the founding leader of the group. The congregation originated through the immigration of several families from South Dakota.

Emmanuel was originally a Krimmer Mennonite Brethren church.

[edit] Bibliography

"Brief history of the Emmanuel MB Church, Langham, Sask.," 1967, 8 pp. Centre for Mennonite Brethren Studies.

Toews, John A. A History of the Mennonite Brethren Church: Pilgrims and Pioneers. 1975: 183.


Author(s) Paul Stahl
Marlene Epp
Date Published February 1989


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Stahl, Paul and Marlene Epp. "Emmanuel Mennonite Brethren Church (Langham, Saskatchewan, Canada)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. February 1989. Web. 25 Nov 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Emmanuel_Mennonite_Brethren_Church_(Langham,_Saskatchewan,_Canada)&oldid=91693.

APA style

Stahl, Paul and Marlene Epp. (February 1989). Emmanuel Mennonite Brethren Church (Langham, Saskatchewan, Canada). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 25 November 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Emmanuel_Mennonite_Brethren_Church_(Langham,_Saskatchewan,_Canada)&oldid=91693.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 2, p. 203. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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