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The Ellemere Mennonite Mission began with a Sunday school in the home of Leonard and Daisy Brown. They were members of the Toronto Mennonite Mission and had previously organized a Sunday school in the Warden Park area of Toronto before moving to a home on Ellesmere Road. Within the first year Sunday evening preaching services were also held, often by Emerson McDowell.

A small church building on a temporary foundation was erected on Brown's property in 1949. A more permanent building on the site was occupied in 1954. Leonard Brown was ordained as a minister in 1954, but his ministerial credentials were suspended by the conference two years later. Raymond Erb then provided pastoral leadership until the church was forced to close in 1958 after the Mennonite Mission Board of Ontario refused to buy the church property from the Browns at their requested price. The final service at Ellesmere was held 11 May 1958. In 1957 the congregation had 20 members, with an average Sunday attendance of 60. The small membership then scattered to other congregations. 

Ellesmere Mennonite Mission was affiliated with the Mennonite Conference of Ontario for its entire history.

Bibliography

Calendar of Appointments Mennonite Church of Ontario (191946/47-1958/59)

Records at Mennonite Archives of Ontario.


Author(s) Sam Steiner
Date Published March 2011


Cite This Article

MLA style

Steiner, Sam. "Ellesmere Mennonite Mission (Scarborough, Ontario, Canada)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. March 2011. Web. 19 Apr 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Ellesmere_Mennonite_Mission_(Scarborough,_Ontario,_Canada)&oldid=91690.

APA style

Steiner, Sam. (March 2011). Ellesmere Mennonite Mission (Scarborough, Ontario, Canada). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 19 April 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Ellesmere_Mennonite_Mission_(Scarborough,_Ontario,_Canada)&oldid=91690.




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