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After the Amos Sherk Mennonite Church divided into three factions in the mid-1980s, one group under Tilman Hoover joined the David Martin Church and another group under Amos Sherk joined the Orthodox Mennonites. A small number of these families remained in Waterloo County, Ontario and continued to use the original Orthodox Mennonite meetinghouse on the Lawson Line, Wellesley Township. In 1993 they chose Elam M. Martin to be their voller Diener (unordained bishop).

In 1998 the Elam M. Martin Mennonites elected and ordained Alvin Martin to the ministry. Four years later Elam M. Martin died, and in 2006 Alvin Martin with some supporting members separated from the group and moved to Chesley in Bruce County, Ontario (see Alvin Martin Mennonites).

Half of the remaining members joined the Orthodox Mennonites in 2009. This led the Orthodox Mennonites to resume meetings in Waterloo Region after a lapse of around 30 years. The remaining families of the Elam M. Martin group continued to meet under the lay-leadership of Eli Sherk and David Martin, in Wellesley Township, near Linwood, Ontario.

See also Pure Church Movement

Bibliography

Martin, Donald. Old Order Mennonites of Ontario: Gelassenheit, Discipleship, Brotherhood. Kitchener, Ont: Pandora Press, 2003: 185.


Author(s) Peter Hoover
Date Published July 2010


Cite This Article

MLA style

Hoover, Peter. "Elam M. Martin Mennonites (Ontario, Canada)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. July 2010. Web. 26 Nov 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Elam_M._Martin_Mennonites_(Ontario,_Canada)&oldid=80408.

APA style

Hoover, Peter. (July 2010). Elam M. Martin Mennonites (Ontario, Canada). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 26 November 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Elam_M._Martin_Mennonites_(Ontario,_Canada)&oldid=80408.




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