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The East Chestnut Street Mennonite Church, Lancaster, [[Pennsylvania (USA)|Pennsylvania]], a member of the [[Lancaster Mennonite Conference (Mennonite Church USA)|Lancaster Mennonite Conference]], is located at 432-434 East Chestnut Street in [[Lancaster (Pennsylvania, USA)|Lancaster]]. The first meetinghouse was built on this site in 1879, services having previously been held in a rented building on Charlotte Street. This meetinghouse was replaced in 1906 by a larger brick church. The trustees of the first meetinghouse, members of adjoining country churches, took their turns in caring for the afternoon services. A Sunday school was opened in 1894 with Benjamin F. Herr and David Lantz as superintendents. On 11 December 1904, [[Mosemann, John Heer (1877-1938)|John H. Mosemann]] was ordained to the ministry, and in 1926 to the office of bishop. On 30 June 1907, David H. Mosemann was ordained to the ministry. For years the church was a young people's center every second Sunday night. Numerous all-day meetings were also held here. The ministers in 1955 were Noah G. Good, Jacob E. Brubaker, and Mylin Shenk. Services were held twice each Sunday, with a Sunday school, a summer Bible school, and a [[Weekday Bible School|weekday Bible school]] each fall.
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[[File:EastChestnutMennoniteChurch.jpg|350px|thumbnail|''East Chestnut Mennonite Church<br /> Source: [http://www.engelarchitects.com/design/eastchestnut1.html Engel Architects website]'']]
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The East Chestnut Street Mennonite Church, Lancaster, [[Pennsylvania (USA)|Pennsylvania]], formerly a member of the [[Lancaster Mennonite Conference (Mennonite Church USA)|Lancaster Mennonite Conference]], is located in [[Lancaster (Pennsylvania, USA)|Lancaster]]. The first meetinghouse was built on this site in 1879, services having previously been held in a rented building on Charlotte Street. This meetinghouse was replaced in 1906 by a larger brick church. The trustees of the first meetinghouse, members of adjoining country churches, took their turns in caring for the afternoon services. A Sunday school was opened in 1894 with Benjamin F. Herr and David Lantz as superintendents. On 11 December 1904, [[Mosemann, John Heer (1877-1938)|John H. Mosemann]] was ordained to the ministry, and in 1926 to the office of bishop. On 30 June 1907, David H. Mosemann was ordained to the ministry. For years the church was a young people's center every second Sunday night. Numerous all-day meetings were also held here. The ministers in 1955 were Noah G. Good, Jacob E. Brubaker, and Mylin Shenk. Services were held twice each Sunday, with a Sunday school, a summer Bible school, and a [[Weekday Bible School|weekday Bible school]] each fall.
  
The congregation has been directly or indirectly the mother of a number of mission congregations in and near the city of Lancaster, among them being [[James Street Mennonite Church (Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA)|Vine Street]]<em>, </em>[[Blossom Hill Mennonite Church (Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA)|North End]], Rossmere, [[Lancaster Christian Street Mission (Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA)|South Christian Street]], Laurel and Freemont Streets, Lyndon. It has also suffered many losses by withdrawals. A considerable number of the Calvary Bible Church (independent) came from East Chestnut Street, while a block of members leaving in 1952 organized the Neffsville Mennonite Church under the [[Ohio and Eastern Mennonite Conference (MC)|Ohio and Eastern Conference]]. Earlier a number had left to share in the organization of the [[Forest Hills Mennonite Church (Leola, Pennsylvania, USA)|Monterey Mennonite Church]] under the same conference, near Bird-in-Hand, Pennsylvania. As a result of these vicissitudes, the congregation has declined severely in membership (1955, 200).
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The congregation has been directly or indirectly the mother of a number of mission congregations in and near the city of Lancaster, among them being [[James Street Mennonite Church (Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA)|Vine Street]], [[Blossom Hill Mennonite Church (Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA)|North End]], Rossmere, [[Crossroads Mennonite Church (Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA)|South Christian Street]], Laurel and Freemont Streets, Lyndon. It has also suffered many losses by withdrawals. A considerable number of the Calvary Bible Church (independent) came from East Chestnut Street, while a block of members leaving in 1952 organized the Neffsville Mennonite Church under the [[Ohio and Eastern Mennonite Conference (MC)|Ohio and Eastern Conference]]. Earlier a number had left to share in the organization of the [[Forest Hills Mennonite Church (Leola, Pennsylvania, USA)|Monterey Mennonite Church]] under the same conference, near Bird-in-Hand, Pennsylvania. As a result of these vicissitudes, the congregation has declined severely in membership (1955, 200).
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On 12 June 2016, the congregation voted with 96 percent approval to leave Lancaster Mennonite Conference after the Conference had announced its intention to depart from Mennonite Church USA by the end of 2017. Later that year the congregation joined the [[Atlantic Coast Conference of Mennonite Church USA|Atlantic Coast Conference]] at their fall assembly.
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=== Bibliography ===
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Houser, Gordon and Hannah Heinzekehr. "Congregational Affiliations Shifts for Some in Lancaster Mennonite Conference." ''The Mennonite'' (7 November 2016). Web. 29 November 2016. https://themennonite.org/daily-news/congregational-affiliation-shifts-around-lancaster/.
 
= Additional Information =
 
= Additional Information =
East Chestnut Street Mennonite Church [http://ecsmc.org/ website]
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'''Address''': 432 East Chestnut Street, Lancaster, PA 17602-3050
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'''Phone''': 717-392-7910
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'''Website''': [http://ecsmc.org East Chestnut Street Mennonite Church]
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'''Denominational Affiliations''':
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[http://www.lancasterconference.org/ Lancaster Mennonite Conference] (until 2016)
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[http://atlanticcoastconference.net/ Atlantic Coast Conference] (2016-present)
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[http://www.mennoniteusa.org/ Mennonite Church USA]
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= Map =
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[[Map:East Chestnut Street Mennonite Church (Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA)]]
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 2, pp. 118-119|date=1953|a1_last=Landis|a1_first=Ira D|a2_last= |a2_first= }}
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 2, pp. 118-119|date=1953|a1_last=Landis|a1_first=Ira D|a2_last= |a2_first= }}
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[[Category:Churches]]
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[[Category:Mennonite Church (MC) Congregations]]
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[[Category:Mennonite Church USA Congregations]]
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[[Category:Lancaster Mennonite Conference Congregations]]
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[[Category:Atlantic Coast Conference of Mennonite Church USA Congregations]]
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[[Category:Pennsylvania Congregations]]
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[[Category:United States Congregations]]

Latest revision as of 03:07, 30 November 2016

Contents

East Chestnut Mennonite Church
Source: Engel Architects website

The East Chestnut Street Mennonite Church, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, formerly a member of the Lancaster Mennonite Conference, is located in Lancaster. The first meetinghouse was built on this site in 1879, services having previously been held in a rented building on Charlotte Street. This meetinghouse was replaced in 1906 by a larger brick church. The trustees of the first meetinghouse, members of adjoining country churches, took their turns in caring for the afternoon services. A Sunday school was opened in 1894 with Benjamin F. Herr and David Lantz as superintendents. On 11 December 1904, John H. Mosemann was ordained to the ministry, and in 1926 to the office of bishop. On 30 June 1907, David H. Mosemann was ordained to the ministry. For years the church was a young people's center every second Sunday night. Numerous all-day meetings were also held here. The ministers in 1955 were Noah G. Good, Jacob E. Brubaker, and Mylin Shenk. Services were held twice each Sunday, with a Sunday school, a summer Bible school, and a weekday Bible school each fall.

The congregation has been directly or indirectly the mother of a number of mission congregations in and near the city of Lancaster, among them being Vine Street, North End, Rossmere, South Christian Street, Laurel and Freemont Streets, Lyndon. It has also suffered many losses by withdrawals. A considerable number of the Calvary Bible Church (independent) came from East Chestnut Street, while a block of members leaving in 1952 organized the Neffsville Mennonite Church under the Ohio and Eastern Conference. Earlier a number had left to share in the organization of the Monterey Mennonite Church under the same conference, near Bird-in-Hand, Pennsylvania. As a result of these vicissitudes, the congregation has declined severely in membership (1955, 200).

On 12 June 2016, the congregation voted with 96 percent approval to leave Lancaster Mennonite Conference after the Conference had announced its intention to depart from Mennonite Church USA by the end of 2017. Later that year the congregation joined the Atlantic Coast Conference at their fall assembly.

[edit] Bibliography

Houser, Gordon and Hannah Heinzekehr. "Congregational Affiliations Shifts for Some in Lancaster Mennonite Conference." The Mennonite (7 November 2016). Web. 29 November 2016. https://themennonite.org/daily-news/congregational-affiliation-shifts-around-lancaster/.

[edit] Additional Information

Address: 432 East Chestnut Street, Lancaster, PA 17602-3050

Phone: 717-392-7910

Website: East Chestnut Street Mennonite Church

Denominational Affiliations:

Lancaster Mennonite Conference (until 2016)

Atlantic Coast Conference (2016-present)

Mennonite Church USA

[edit] Map

Map:East Chestnut Street Mennonite Church (Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA)


Author(s) Ira D Landis
Date Published 1953


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Landis, Ira D. "East Chestnut Street Mennonite Church (Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1953. Web. 4 Dec 2016. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=East_Chestnut_Street_Mennonite_Church_(Lancaster,_Pennsylvania,_USA)&oldid=141450.

APA style

Landis, Ira D. (1953). East Chestnut Street Mennonite Church (Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 4 December 2016, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=East_Chestnut_Street_Mennonite_Church_(Lancaster,_Pennsylvania,_USA)&oldid=141450.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Kitchener, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 2, pp. 118-119. All rights reserved.


©1996-2016 by the Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. All rights reserved.