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[[File:M2004F-59.jpg|300px|thumb|right|''Jakob & Tina Dyck, ca. 1918. MAO Photo M2004-59  
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[[File:M2004F-59.jpg|300px|thumb|right|''Jakob &amp; Tina Dyck, ca. 1918. MAO Photo M2004-59'']]    Jakob J. Dyck was born 7 December 1890 in the [[Crimea (Ukraine)|Crimea]], South [[Russia|Russia]], to Jacob J. and Sara (Reimer) Dyck, who owned a large ranch. He was the fifth in a family of nine children. He completed his secondary education in the Crimea and then went to Ilmenau, [[Germany|Germany]], to study engineering, and worked for some time as an engineer in Berlin. Just before [[World War (1914-1918)|World War I]] he returned to Russia and in 1914 entered the medical service <em>([[Sanitätsdienst|Sanitätsdienst]]) </em>in Moscow. On 26 August 1916, he was married to Tina Fehderau of [[Neu-Halbstadt (Molotschna Mennonite Settlement, Zaporizhia Oblast, Ukraine)|Neu-Halbstadt]]. To this union one son was born, who died in infancy.
  
'']]    Jakob J. Dyck was born 7 December 1890 in the [[Crimea (Ukraine)|Crimea]], South [[Russia|Russia]], to Jacob J. and Sara (Reimer) Dyck, who owned a large ranch. He was the fifth in a family of nine children. He completed his secondary education in the Crimea and then went to Ilmenau, [[Germany|Germany]], to study engineering, and worked for some time as an engineer in Berlin. Just before [[World War (1914-1918)|World War I]] he returned to Russia and in 1914 entered the medical service <em>([[Sanitätsdienst|Sanitätsdienst]]) </em>in Moscow. On 26 August 1916, he was married to Tina Fehderau of [[Neu-Halbstadt (Molotschna Mennonite Settlement, Zaporizhia Oblast, Ukraine)|Neu-Halbstadt]]. To this union one son was born, who died in infancy.
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[[File:M2004F-60.jpg|300px|thumb|right|''An early tent-meeting, ca. 1918.
  
[[File:M2004F-60.jpg|300px|thumb|right|''An early tent-meeting, ca. 1918.
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MAO photo M2004-60'']]    Jacob J. Dyck was converted at the age of 17 under the preaching of Johann Warns, and was received into the [[Rückenau Mennonite Brethren Church (Rückenau, Molotschna Mennonite Settlement, Zaporizhia Oblast, Ukraine)|Rückenau Mennonite Brethren Church]],<strong> </strong>[[Molotschna Mennonite Settlement (Zaporizhia Oblast, Ukraine)|Molotschna]]. Immediately he manifested a special interest in the salvation of his fellow men, and distinguished himself by his leadership in fostering Christian organizations among the men during the war. Upon his release from the medical service he devoted his talents to evangelism in tent-missions, preaching the Gospel and traveling from village to village with his colaborers until he and his party were seized while conducting evangelistic meetings by [[Makhno, Nestor (1888-1934)|Makhno]] bandits in the village of [[Eichenfeld (Yazykovo Mennonite Settlement, Zaporizhia Oblast, Ukraine)|Eichenfeld]], [[Yazykovo Mennonite Settlement (Zaporizhia Oblast, Ukraine)|Yazekovo settlement]], and murdered on 26 October 1919. The former Mrs. Jakob J. Dyck later migrated to [[Kitchener-Waterloo (Ontario, Canada)|Kitchener]], [[Ontario (Canada)|Ontario]].
 
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MAO photo M2004-60  
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'']]    Jacob J. Dyck was converted at the age of 17 under the preaching of Johann Warns, and was received into the [[Rückenau Mennonite Brethren Church (Rückenau, Molotschna Mennonite Settlement, Zaporizhia Oblast, Ukraine)|Rückenau Mennonite Brethren Church]],<strong> </strong>[[Molotschna Mennonite Settlement (Zaporizhia Oblast, Ukraine)|Molotschna]]. Immediately he manifested a special interest in the salvation of his fellow men, and distinguished himself by his leadership in fostering Christian organizations among the men during the war. Upon his release from the medical service he devoted his talents to evangelism in tent-missions, preaching the Gospel and traveling from village to village with his colaborers until he and his party were seized while conducting evangelistic meetings by [[Makhno, Nestor (1888-1934)|Makhno]] bandits in the village of [[Eichenfeld (Yazykovo Mennonite Settlement, Zaporizhia Oblast, Ukraine)|Eichenfeld]], [[Yazykovo Mennonite Settlement (Zaporizhia Oblast, Ukraine)|Yazekovo settlement]], and murdered on 26 October 1919. The former Mrs. Jakob J. Dyck later migrated to [[Kitchener-Waterloo (Ontario, Canada)|Kitchener]], [[Ontario (Canada)|Ontario]].
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= Bibliography =
 
= Bibliography =
 
Kroeker, Abraham. <em>Bilder aus Sowjet-Russland</em>. Mountain Lake, Minnesota: A. Kroeker; Striegau [Strzegom] in Schlesien: Th. Urban, 1930.
 
Kroeker, Abraham. <em>Bilder aus Sowjet-Russland</em>. Mountain Lake, Minnesota: A. Kroeker; Striegau [Strzegom] in Schlesien: Th. Urban, 1930.

Revision as of 14:30, 23 August 2013

Jakob & Tina Dyck, ca. 1918. MAO Photo M2004-59
Jakob J. Dyck was born 7 December 1890 in the Crimea, South Russia, to Jacob J. and Sara (Reimer) Dyck, who owned a large ranch. He was the fifth in a family of nine children. He completed his secondary education in the Crimea and then went to Ilmenau, Germany, to study engineering, and worked for some time as an engineer in Berlin. Just before World War I he returned to Russia and in 1914 entered the medical service (Sanitätsdienst) in Moscow. On 26 August 1916, he was married to Tina Fehderau of Neu-Halbstadt. To this union one son was born, who died in infancy.
An early tent-meeting, ca. 1918. MAO photo M2004-60
Jacob J. Dyck was converted at the age of 17 under the preaching of Johann Warns, and was received into the Rückenau Mennonite Brethren Church, Molotschna. Immediately he manifested a special interest in the salvation of his fellow men, and distinguished himself by his leadership in fostering Christian organizations among the men during the war. Upon his release from the medical service he devoted his talents to evangelism in tent-missions, preaching the Gospel and traveling from village to village with his colaborers until he and his party were seized while conducting evangelistic meetings by Makhno bandits in the village of Eichenfeld, Yazekovo settlement, and murdered on 26 October 1919. The former Mrs. Jakob J. Dyck later migrated to Kitchener, Ontario.

Bibliography

Kroeker, Abraham. Bilder aus Sowjet-Russland. Mountain Lake, Minnesota: A. Kroeker; Striegau [Strzegom] in Schlesien: Th. Urban, 1930.

Toews, Aron A. Mennonitische Märtyrer der jüngsten Vergangenheit und der Gegenwart. Abbotsford, B.C.: Selbstverlag des Verfassers 1949-1954: 130-34.


Author(s) A. A Toews
Date Published 1956


Cite This Article

MLA style

Toews, A. A. "Dyck, Jakob J. (1890-1919)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1956. Web. 28 Dec 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Dyck,_Jakob_J._(1890-1919)&oldid=94462.

APA style

Toews, A. A. (1956). Dyck, Jakob J. (1890-1919). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 28 December 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Dyck,_Jakob_J._(1890-1919)&oldid=94462.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 2, p. 115. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


©1996-2014 by the Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. All rights reserved.