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Dohner Mennonite Church ([[Eastern Pennsylvania Mennonite Church|Eastern Pennsylvania Mennonite Church]], originally [[Mennonite Church (MC)|Mennonite Church]]), located near Annville on Cedar Run Road, [[Lebanon County (Pennsylvania, USA)|Lebanon County]], [[Pennsylvania (USA)|Pennsylvania]], was a member of the [[Lancaster Mennonite Conference (Mennonite Church USA)|Lancaster Mennonite Conference]]. Bishop Frederick Kauffman gave land for a meetinghouse in 1768 two miles north of Annville. In 1851 when friction developed with the [[Evangelical United Brethren Church|United Brethren]], Bishop Jacob Dohner moved a mile east and built a 24 x 36 ft. brick church. Membership and Sunday school enrollment in 1954 were 29 and 45 respectively. Simon Bücher was bishop and Robert Miller the preacher at that time. In the late 1960s Dohner was part of the group of congregations that formed the more conservative Eastern Pennsylvania Mennonite Church.
 
Dohner Mennonite Church ([[Eastern Pennsylvania Mennonite Church|Eastern Pennsylvania Mennonite Church]], originally [[Mennonite Church (MC)|Mennonite Church]]), located near Annville on Cedar Run Road, [[Lebanon County (Pennsylvania, USA)|Lebanon County]], [[Pennsylvania (USA)|Pennsylvania]], was a member of the [[Lancaster Mennonite Conference (Mennonite Church USA)|Lancaster Mennonite Conference]]. Bishop Frederick Kauffman gave land for a meetinghouse in 1768 two miles north of Annville. In 1851 when friction developed with the [[Evangelical United Brethren Church|United Brethren]], Bishop Jacob Dohner moved a mile east and built a 24 x 36 ft. brick church. Membership and Sunday school enrollment in 1954 were 29 and 45 respectively. Simon Bücher was bishop and Robert Miller the preacher at that time. In the late 1960s Dohner was part of the group of congregations that formed the more conservative Eastern Pennsylvania Mennonite Church.
 
 
 
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{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 2, p. 80|date=1956|a1_last=Landis|a1_first=Ira D|a2_last=|a2_first=}}

Revision as of 19:10, 20 August 2013

Dohner Mennonite Church (Eastern Pennsylvania Mennonite Church, originally Mennonite Church), located near Annville on Cedar Run Road, Lebanon County, Pennsylvania, was a member of the Lancaster Mennonite Conference. Bishop Frederick Kauffman gave land for a meetinghouse in 1768 two miles north of Annville. In 1851 when friction developed with the United Brethren, Bishop Jacob Dohner moved a mile east and built a 24 x 36 ft. brick church. Membership and Sunday school enrollment in 1954 were 29 and 45 respectively. Simon Bücher was bishop and Robert Miller the preacher at that time. In the late 1960s Dohner was part of the group of congregations that formed the more conservative Eastern Pennsylvania Mennonite Church.


Author(s) Ira D Landis
Date Published 1956


Cite This Article

MLA style

Landis, Ira D. "Dohner Mennonite Church (Lebanon, Pennsylvania, USA)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1956. Web. 31 Jul 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Dohner_Mennonite_Church_(Lebanon,_Pennsylvania,_USA)&oldid=80228.

APA style

Landis, Ira D. (1956). Dohner Mennonite Church (Lebanon, Pennsylvania, USA). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 31 July 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Dohner_Mennonite_Church_(Lebanon,_Pennsylvania,_USA)&oldid=80228.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 2, p. 80. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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