Difference between revisions of "Denver Mennonite Church (Denver, Pennsylvania, USA)"

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[[File:Denver-Mennonite-Church-Denver-2017.jpg|300px|thumb|''Denver Mennonite Church, 2017.<br/>Photo by Collin Miller'']]
 
Denver Mennonite Church ([[Mennonite Church (MC)|Mennonite Church]]), also known as the Denver Mennonite Meetinghouse, is located on the northeastern edge of this thriving borough of 1,800 in 1959 (population, 3,332 in 2000) in [[Lancaster County (Pennsylvania, USA)|Lancaster County]], [[Pennsylvania (USA)|Pennsylvania]]. Among the early settlers here were the John Bucher, Michael Bear, John Shirk, Jacob Polinger, and Huber families. In 1760 they were worshiping at Hershberger's farm on the west side of Union Station, hence known by his name. It was a part of the Hammer Creek Bishop District and the Indian town circuit. In 1877 a brick union church was built for the use of German Baptists, German (Old and New) Mennonites, German Lutheran and Reformed in Bucher's of East Cocalico, on a six weeks' schedule, one group meeting each six weeks. The Reformed and the Lutherans built in the borough in 1890 (separating from the others in 1912). On 8 May 1928, the [[Reformed Mennonite Church|New (Reformed) Mennonites]], whose membership was never above 50, relinquished all rights to the house. The building was thoroughly renovated and Sunday-school rooms added, with an opening on 13 March 1955. An old cemetery adjoins. The membership in 1954 numbered 30, and Amos S. Horst was the bishop in charge at that time. In 1958 Isaac K. Sensenig was pastor, assisted by the Indiantown ministry, with a membership of 38.
 
Denver Mennonite Church ([[Mennonite Church (MC)|Mennonite Church]]), also known as the Denver Mennonite Meetinghouse, is located on the northeastern edge of this thriving borough of 1,800 in 1959 (population, 3,332 in 2000) in [[Lancaster County (Pennsylvania, USA)|Lancaster County]], [[Pennsylvania (USA)|Pennsylvania]]. Among the early settlers here were the John Bucher, Michael Bear, John Shirk, Jacob Polinger, and Huber families. In 1760 they were worshiping at Hershberger's farm on the west side of Union Station, hence known by his name. It was a part of the Hammer Creek Bishop District and the Indian town circuit. In 1877 a brick union church was built for the use of German Baptists, German (Old and New) Mennonites, German Lutheran and Reformed in Bucher's of East Cocalico, on a six weeks' schedule, one group meeting each six weeks. The Reformed and the Lutherans built in the borough in 1890 (separating from the others in 1912). On 8 May 1928, the [[Reformed Mennonite Church|New (Reformed) Mennonites]], whose membership was never above 50, relinquished all rights to the house. The building was thoroughly renovated and Sunday-school rooms added, with an opening on 13 March 1955. An old cemetery adjoins. The membership in 1954 numbered 30, and Amos S. Horst was the bishop in charge at that time. In 1958 Isaac K. Sensenig was pastor, assisted by the Indiantown ministry, with a membership of 38.
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 2, p. 39; vol. 4, p. 1075|date=1959|a1_last=Landis|a1_first=Ira D|a2_last=|a2_first=}}
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In 1969 Denver Mennonite was one of 13 congregations who followed a group of bishops, ministers, and deacons who were granted a release from the Lancaster Mennonite Conference to form the [[Eastern Pennsylvania Mennonite Church]]. Major issues were a new 1968 Lancaster Conference discipline that appeared to tolerate more freedom in [[Dress|dress]] regulations, the increasing use of [[Television|television]] by conference members, and the granting of membership by some congregations to persons who had been [[Divorce and Remarriage|divorced and remarried]].
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In 2017 Harold B. Good was the bishop, and Jl. Ray Auker and Luke G. Sensenig were the ministers. The membership in 2017 was 115.
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= Bibliography =
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Graber, Robert B. "An Amiable Mennonite Schism: The Origin of the Eastern Pennsylvania Mennonite Church." ''Pennsylvania Mennonite Heritage'' 7 (October 1984): 2-10.
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''Mennonite Church Directory'' 2017. Harrisonburg, VA: Christian Light Publications, Inc., 2017: 69.
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= Additional Information =
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'''Address''': 95 Monroe Street, Denver, Pennsylvania
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'''Phone''': 717-336-7316
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'''Website''':
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'''Denominational Affiliations''':
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[[Eastern Pennsylvania Mennonite Church]]
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{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 2, p. 39; vol. 4, p. 1075|date=November 2017|a1_last=Landis|a1_first=Ira D|a2_last=Steiner|a2_first=Sam}}
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[[Category:Churches]]
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[[Category:Lancaster Mennonite Conference Congregations]]
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[[Category:Mennonite Church (MC) Congregations]]
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[[Category:Eastern Pennsylvania Mennonite Church Congregations]]
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[[Category:Pennsylvania Congregations]]
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[[Category:United States Congregations]]

Latest revision as of 19:45, 10 November 2017

Denver Mennonite Church, 2017.
Photo by Collin Miller

Denver Mennonite Church (Mennonite Church), also known as the Denver Mennonite Meetinghouse, is located on the northeastern edge of this thriving borough of 1,800 in 1959 (population, 3,332 in 2000) in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. Among the early settlers here were the John Bucher, Michael Bear, John Shirk, Jacob Polinger, and Huber families. In 1760 they were worshiping at Hershberger's farm on the west side of Union Station, hence known by his name. It was a part of the Hammer Creek Bishop District and the Indian town circuit. In 1877 a brick union church was built for the use of German Baptists, German (Old and New) Mennonites, German Lutheran and Reformed in Bucher's of East Cocalico, on a six weeks' schedule, one group meeting each six weeks. The Reformed and the Lutherans built in the borough in 1890 (separating from the others in 1912). On 8 May 1928, the New (Reformed) Mennonites, whose membership was never above 50, relinquished all rights to the house. The building was thoroughly renovated and Sunday-school rooms added, with an opening on 13 March 1955. An old cemetery adjoins. The membership in 1954 numbered 30, and Amos S. Horst was the bishop in charge at that time. In 1958 Isaac K. Sensenig was pastor, assisted by the Indiantown ministry, with a membership of 38.

In 1969 Denver Mennonite was one of 13 congregations who followed a group of bishops, ministers, and deacons who were granted a release from the Lancaster Mennonite Conference to form the Eastern Pennsylvania Mennonite Church. Major issues were a new 1968 Lancaster Conference discipline that appeared to tolerate more freedom in dress regulations, the increasing use of television by conference members, and the granting of membership by some congregations to persons who had been divorced and remarried.

In 2017 Harold B. Good was the bishop, and Jl. Ray Auker and Luke G. Sensenig were the ministers. The membership in 2017 was 115.

Bibliography

Graber, Robert B. "An Amiable Mennonite Schism: The Origin of the Eastern Pennsylvania Mennonite Church." Pennsylvania Mennonite Heritage 7 (October 1984): 2-10.

Mennonite Church Directory 2017. Harrisonburg, VA: Christian Light Publications, Inc., 2017: 69.

Additional Information

Address: 95 Monroe Street, Denver, Pennsylvania

Phone: 717-336-7316

Website:

Denominational Affiliations: Eastern Pennsylvania Mennonite Church


Author(s) Ira D Landis
Sam Steiner
Date Published November 2017


Cite This Article

MLA style

Landis, Ira D and Sam Steiner. "Denver Mennonite Church (Denver, Pennsylvania, USA)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. November 2017. Web. 12 Dec 2017. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Denver_Mennonite_Church_(Denver,_Pennsylvania,_USA)&oldid=155708.

APA style

Landis, Ira D and Sam Steiner. (November 2017). Denver Mennonite Church (Denver, Pennsylvania, USA). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 12 December 2017, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Denver_Mennonite_Church_(Denver,_Pennsylvania,_USA)&oldid=155708.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 2, p. 39; vol. 4, p. 1075. All rights reserved.


©1996-2017 by the Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. All rights reserved.