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Matheus (Mathieu) van Delden, an important industrialist of Westphalia, Germany, was born 26 May 1828, in Nordhorn, and died 10 Februrary 1904, in Gronau. He was the son of Jan van Delden, a merchant of Deventer, who moved to Nordhorn in Hannover early in the 19th century. Matheus was the fourth of 11 children. At the age of 16 he attended the school of weaving at Elberfeld, and then learned the trade from the bottom of the ladder. His capabilities were such that he had no difficulty in finding the capital to set up his own weaving firm in Gronau in the 1860s, which went through the entire evolution from hand spinning and weaving (the latter done in the homes) down to completely modernized mechanized methods. In 1914 the factory employed 1,500 workers. He was still active in his business when his final illness overtook him and he died at the age of 76 years. Unfortunately he did not live to see the dedication of the Mennonite church in Gronau, in which he had a sincere interest, and for which he contributed a substantial sum.

Bibliography

Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. Mennonitisches Lexikon, 4 vols. Frankfurt & Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe; Schneider, 1913-1967: I, 400.


Author(s) J. van Delden
Date Published 1956


Cite This Article

MLA style

Delden, J. van. "Delden, Matheus van (1828-1904)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1956. Web. 2 Sep 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Delden,_Matheus_van_(1828-1904)&oldid=106181.

APA style

Delden, J. van. (1956). Delden, Matheus van (1828-1904). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 2 September 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Delden,_Matheus_van_(1828-1904)&oldid=106181.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 2, p. 30. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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