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[[File:PA-Cumberland.jpg|300px|thumb|right|''Cumberland County, Pennsylvania  
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[[File:PA-Cumberland.jpg|300px|thumb|right|''Cumberland County, Pennsylvania
  
U.S. Census TIGER/Line map  
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U.S. Census TIGER/Line map'']]    Cumberland County, [[Pennsylvania (USA)|Pennsylvania]], located southwest of Harrisburg, was carved out of [[Lancaster County (Pennsylvania, USA)|Lancaster County]] on 27 January 1750. In 1755 the Proprietary Government suggested that the Irish settle here, leaving Lancaster for the Mennonites. Consequently the Mennonites did not move in before the late 1780s and 1790s, and their first house of worship was Slate Hill, built in 1820. In 1950 there were three Mennonite churches in the county: Slate Hill, [[Churchtown Mennonite Church (Carlisle, Pennsylvania, USA)|Churchtown]], and [[Diller Mennonite Church (Newville, Pennsylvania, USA)|Diller]]. William M. Strong was the bishop of these churches.
 
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'']]    Cumberland County, [[Pennsylvania (USA)|Pennsylvania]], located southwest of Harrisburg, was carved out of [[Lancaster County (Pennsylvania, USA)|Lancaster County]] on 27 January 1750. In 1755 the Proprietary Government suggested that the Irish settle here, leaving Lancaster for the Mennonites. Consequently the Mennonites did not move in before the late 1780s and 1790s, and their first house of worship was Slate Hill, built in 1820. In 1950 there were three Mennonite churches in the county: Slate Hill, [[Churchtown Mennonite Church (Carlisle, Pennsylvania, USA)|Churchtown]], and [[Diller Mennonite Church (Newville, Pennsylvania, USA)|Diller]]. William M. Strong was the bishop of these churches.
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{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 1, p. 746|date=1953|a1_last=Landis|a1_first=Ira D|a2_last=|a2_first=}}
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 1, p. 746|date=1953|a1_last=Landis|a1_first=Ira D|a2_last=|a2_first=}}

Latest revision as of 14:29, 23 August 2013

Cumberland County, Pennsylvania U.S. Census TIGER/Line map
Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, located southwest of Harrisburg, was carved out of Lancaster County on 27 January 1750. In 1755 the Proprietary Government suggested that the Irish settle here, leaving Lancaster for the Mennonites. Consequently the Mennonites did not move in before the late 1780s and 1790s, and their first house of worship was Slate Hill, built in 1820. In 1950 there were three Mennonite churches in the county: Slate Hill, Churchtown, and Diller. William M. Strong was the bishop of these churches.


Author(s) Ira D Landis
Date Published 1953


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Landis, Ira D. "Cumberland County (Pennsylvania, USA)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1953. Web. 14 Jul 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Cumberland_County_(Pennsylvania,_USA)&oldid=94287.

APA style

Landis, Ira D. (1953). Cumberland County (Pennsylvania, USA). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 14 July 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Cumberland_County_(Pennsylvania,_USA)&oldid=94287.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 1, p. 746. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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