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The Cooperative for American Remittances to Europe, universally known as CARE, was conceived for the purpose of making available to American individuals and organizations for foreign relief the vast stores of surplus army rations following World War II. It was organized by the leading American relief groups to render a nonprofit, safe, personalized, packaged relief service with delivery to specific recipients guaranteed. This plan found such wide acceptance that upon the exhaustion of army rations, CARE developed its own food and textile packages. Its area of service later included books and enveloped Asia, making CARE the leading relief organization arising out of the postwar period.

The Mennonite Central Committee was a charter member of CARE and was represented on its Board of Directors until July 1954. The Mennonite constituency purchased over $360,000 worth of CARE packages in the first four years.  During the same period the Mennonite Central Committee benefited by $80,000 through CARE's surplus and general relief distribution.


Author(s) J. N Weaver
Date Published 1953


Cite This Article

MLA style

Weaver, J. N. "Cooperative for American Remittances to Europe (CARE)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1953. Web. 16 Apr 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Cooperative_for_American_Remittances_to_Europe_(CARE)&oldid=86935.

APA style

Weaver, J. N. (1953). Cooperative for American Remittances to Europe (CARE). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 16 April 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Cooperative_for_American_Remittances_to_Europe_(CARE)&oldid=86935.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 1, pp. 516-517. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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