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Contra-Huiskoopers (Anti-Housebuyers) is the name of a party of Flemish Mennonites in Friesland, who in 1586 became involved in a quarrel with the Huiskoopers (house-buyers) concerning the pur­chase of a house by Thomas Bintgens in Franeker. The Huiskoopers were also called the "Thomas Bintgens group," and the Contra-Huiskoopers were called "Jacob Keest group" after their preacher Jacob Reiningen or Keest. The better-known Claes Ganglofs also belonged to the Contra-Huiskoopers. In 1632 and even in 1646 the Flemish Mennonites in Holland were sometimes officially called Contra-Huiskoopers, but soon afterward they were known as the "Sachte (Gentle) Flemish," or simply "Flemish," the name Contra-Huiskoopers falling into disuse.

[edit] Bibliography

Cate, Steven Blaupot ten. Geschiedenis der Doopsgezinden in Friesland. Leeuwarden: W. Eekhoff, 1839: 112, 163.

Cate, Steven Blaupot ten. Geschiedenis der Doopsgezinden in Groningen, Overijssel en Oost-Friesland, 2 vols. Leeuwarden: W. Eekhoff en J. B. Wolters, 1842: I, 57, 271-77.

Doopsgezinde Bijdragen (1875): 30.

Hoop Scheffer, Jacob Gijsbert de. Inventaris der Archiefstukken berustende bij de Vereenigde Doopsgezinde Gemeente to Amsterdam, 2 vols. Amsterdam: Uitgegeven en ten geschenke aangeboden door den Kerkeraad dier Gemeente, 1883-1884: II, Nos. 117, 120-22.

Hege, Christian and Christian Neff.  Mennonitisches Lexikon, 4 vols. Frankfurt & Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe: Schneider, 1913-1967: v. I, 369.


Author(s) Jacob Loosjes
Date Published 1953


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Loosjes, Jacob. "Contra-Huiskoopers." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1953. Web. 8 Dec 2016. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Contra-Huiskoopers&oldid=94235.

APA style

Loosjes, Jacob. (1953). Contra-Huiskoopers. Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 8 December 2016, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Contra-Huiskoopers&oldid=94235.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Kitchener, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 1, p. 704. All rights reserved.


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