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The leaders of the church were: Peter Friesen (1929-1974), Gerhard Elias (1936-1944), Isaak Epp (1936-1947), Jacob Dyck (1945-1960, 1961-1971 [in Pierceland]), Jacob Esau (1948-1983), David Friesen (1951-1974), Cornelius Funk (1952-1965), Fred Heese (1964-1966), Albert Esau (1975-1991), Wes Zacharias (1977-1992), George Dueck (1981-1985), John Janzen (1987-1989), Mike Ginther (1990-).
 
The leaders of the church were: Peter Friesen (1929-1974), Gerhard Elias (1936-1944), Isaak Epp (1936-1947), Jacob Dyck (1945-1960, 1961-1971 [in Pierceland]), Jacob Esau (1948-1983), David Friesen (1951-1974), Cornelius Funk (1952-1965), Fred Heese (1964-1966), Albert Esau (1975-1991), Wes Zacharias (1977-1992), George Dueck (1981-1985), John Janzen (1987-1989), Mike Ginther (1990-).
 
 
 
= Bibliography =
 
= Bibliography =
 
Mennonite Heritage Centre. "Immanuel Mennonite Church (Rapid View, Saskatchewan) fonds." 3 December 2003. Web. 1 October 2010. [http://www.mennonitechurch.ca/programs/archives/holdings/SK/SK_ImmanuelMC.htm http://www.mennonitechurch.ca/programs/archives/holdings/SK/SK_ImmanuelMC.htm].
 
Mennonite Heritage Centre. "Immanuel Mennonite Church (Rapid View, Saskatchewan) fonds." 3 December 2003. Web. 1 October 2010. [http://www.mennonitechurch.ca/programs/archives/holdings/SK/SK_ImmanuelMC.htm http://www.mennonitechurch.ca/programs/archives/holdings/SK/SK_ImmanuelMC.htm].
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<h3>Archival Records</h3> Mennonite Heritage Centre Archives, Winnipeg, MB: [http://www.mennonitechurch.ca/programs/archives/holdings/SK/SK_ImmanuelMC.htm Volumes 3684-3685].
 
<h3>Archival Records</h3> Mennonite Heritage Centre Archives, Winnipeg, MB: [http://www.mennonitechurch.ca/programs/archives/holdings/SK/SK_ImmanuelMC.htm Volumes 3684-3685].
 
 
 
= Additional Information =
 
= Additional Information =
 
<strong>Denominational Affiliations</strong>:
 
<strong>Denominational Affiliations</strong>:
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[[Conference of Mennonites in Canada|Conference of Mennonites in Canada]] (1934-1993)
 
[[Conference of Mennonites in Canada|Conference of Mennonites in Canada]] (1934-1993)
 
 
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=|date=October 2010|a1_last=Steiner|a1_first=Sam|a2_last=Thiessen|a2_first=Richard D.}}
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=|date=October 2010|a1_last=Steiner|a1_first=Sam|a2_last=Thiessen|a2_first=Richard D.}}

Latest revision as of 19:42, 20 August 2013

In 1929 the Immanuel Mennonite Church with 26 charter members was founded in the Meadow Lake area of Saskatchewan. Since the Mennonite settlers in the area were quite scattered, a number of smaller meeting stations were started, including Beaverdale, Compass, Daisy Meadow, and Pierceland. Services began at Compass in 1933 and the first building was occupied around 1940. Immanuel Mennonite Church joined the Conference of Mennonites in Canada in 1934. In 1936 the combined membership was 65 and in 1947 it was 86.

In 1961 Pierceland formed a separate congregation, Immanuel Mennonite, but remained part of the Immanuel group of congregations. During the 1950s the dominant congregation was the one formed in Meadow Lake in 1957. In the early 1970s this became an independent congregation, Grace Mennonite Church. In 1972 there were two congregations that made up the Immanuel Mennonite Church, Compass and Beaverdale. The following year, 1973, the multi-congregation church dissolved and they became two independent congregations. In 1975 only the Compass congregation remained, known simply as Immanuel Mennonite Church. At that time the congregation had 17 members. In 1981 it changed its name to the Compass Immanuel Mennonite Church. In 1985 the membership was 46.

Compass Immanuel Mennonite Church withdrew from the Conference of Mennonites in Canada in 1993 due to doctrinal differences, including scriptural interpretation on matters of native traditional religion, homosexuality and inclusive language. The congregation later changed its name to Compass Emmanuel Church.

The leaders of the church were: Peter Friesen (1929-1974), Gerhard Elias (1936-1944), Isaak Epp (1936-1947), Jacob Dyck (1945-1960, 1961-1971 [in Pierceland]), Jacob Esau (1948-1983), David Friesen (1951-1974), Cornelius Funk (1952-1965), Fred Heese (1964-1966), Albert Esau (1975-1991), Wes Zacharias (1977-1992), George Dueck (1981-1985), John Janzen (1987-1989), Mike Ginther (1990-).

Contents

[edit] Bibliography

Mennonite Heritage Centre. "Immanuel Mennonite Church (Rapid View, Saskatchewan) fonds." 3 December 2003. Web. 1 October 2010. http://www.mennonitechurch.ca/programs/archives/holdings/SK/SK_ImmanuelMC.htm.

Mennonite Reporter (23 August 1993): 3.

Archival Records

Mennonite Heritage Centre Archives, Winnipeg, MB: Volumes 3684-3685.

[edit] Additional Information

Denominational Affiliations:

Conference of Mennonites of Saskatchewan (1959-1993)

Conference of Mennonites in Canada (1934-1993)


Author(s) Sam Steiner
Richard D. Thiessen
Date Published October 2010


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Steiner, Sam and Richard D. Thiessen. "Compass Immanuel Mennonite Church (Rapid View, Saskatchewan, Canada)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. October 2010. Web. 27 Dec 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Compass_Immanuel_Mennonite_Church_(Rapid_View,_Saskatchewan,_Canada)&oldid=86885.

APA style

Steiner, Sam and Richard D. Thiessen. (October 2010). Compass Immanuel Mennonite Church (Rapid View, Saskatchewan, Canada). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 27 December 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Compass_Immanuel_Mennonite_Church_(Rapid_View,_Saskatchewan,_Canada)&oldid=86885.




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