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The Coatesville Mennonite Church (Mennonite Church USA), located in a steel center in Chester County, Pennsylvania, was opened in 1929 by the Maple Grove-Millwood congregation. John E. Kennel was the first superintendent. A store building, the third floor of the Fire Hall, and in 1930 the new building at 625 Walnut St. were used as meeting places, under the auspices of the Eastern Board of Missions and Charities of the Lancaster Mennonite Conference.  In 1940 Frank Stoltzfus became resident pastor, and in 1954 George B. Stoltzfus was pastor. A summer Bible school among the African Americans developed into the Newlinville mission station. The Coatesville membership in 1953 was 60, and the Sunday-school enrollment 80. In 2011 the membership was 28; the pastors were Leonard L. Groff and Mark C. Hickson.

Additional Information

Address: 625 Walnut Street, Coatesville, Pennsylvania

Phone: 610-383-1921

Denominational Affiliations:

Lancaster Mennonite Conference

Mennonite Church USA 

Maps

Map:Coatesville Mennonite Church (Coatesville, Pennsylvania)


Author(s) Ira D Landis
Date Published 2011


Cite This Article

MLA style

Landis, Ira D. "Coatesville Mennonite Church (Coatesville, Pennsylvania, USA)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 2011. Web. 22 Dec 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Coatesville_Mennonite_Church_(Coatesville,_Pennsylvania,_USA)&oldid=94205.

APA style

Landis, Ira D. (2011). Coatesville Mennonite Church (Coatesville, Pennsylvania, USA). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 22 December 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Coatesville_Mennonite_Church_(Coatesville,_Pennsylvania,_USA)&oldid=94205.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 1, p. 631. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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