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Buhler, a Mennonite town in Reno County, Kansas, located on the Little Arkansas River 12 miles (20 km) northeast of Hutchinson, had a population of about 650 in 1950 (1358 in 2000); it was almost 100 per cent Mennonite in 1950. Approximately 2,000 Mennonites lived within shopping distance of the town. There were a General Conference Mennonite church and a Mennonite Brethren church in Buhler and a number of other Mennonite churches in the vicinity.

Buhler was first called Hamburg. In 1877 Bernhard Buhler settled in Reno County, becoming the cofounder and elder of the Hebron Mennonite Church. Hamburg was incorporated under the name of Buhler in honor of A. B. Buhler, son of Bernhard Buhler, who had established a bank there. The town had a number of business enterprises and an old people's home. It had no theater and no intoxicating drinks were sold there in 1950. Most of the inhabitants and the rural population were descendants of Mennonites who came from the various places in the Molotschna settlement in Russia. Although Low German was still used, English had become the chief means of communication by 1950.

Maps

Map:Buhler (Kansas)


Author(s) Cornelius Krahn
Date Published 1953


Cite This Article

MLA style

Krahn, Cornelius. "Buhler (Kansas, USA)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1953. Web. 1 Sep 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Buhler_(Kansas,_USA)&oldid=86333.

APA style

Krahn, Cornelius. (1953). Buhler (Kansas, USA). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 1 September 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Buhler_(Kansas,_USA)&oldid=86333.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 1, p. 465. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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