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Garfield Schmidt photo. Scan provided by Mennonite
 
Garfield Schmidt photo. Scan provided by Mennonite
  
Archives of Ontario, Digital-4'']]    The Brunk Brothers Revival Campaign (later known as Brunk Revivals, Inc.), an influential revival work among the Mennonites of North America, began in 1951. It was carried on by Preacher George R. Brunk II (1911-2002) of [[Denbigh (Warwick County, Virginia, USA)|Denbigh]], [[Virginia (USA)|Virginia]], the evangelist, and his layman brother Lawrence (1917-2003), who served as business manager and song leader. This team of Christian workers, using a large tent seating 6,000 persons, moved from one large Mennonite center to another during the open season from April to October, holding nightly meetings in a community for three-four weeks, to revive the church and evangelize non-Christians. The following communities were served through 1952: 1951, [[Lancaster (Pennsylvania, USA)|Lancaster]], [[Pennsylvania (USA)|Pennsylvania]], [[Souderton (Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, USA)|Souderton]], Pennsylvania, [[Orrville (Wayne County, Ohio, USA)|Orrville]], [[Ohio (State)|Ohio]], [[Manheim (Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, USA)|Manheim]], Pennsylvania; 1952, [[Johnstown (Pennsylvania, USA)|Johnstown]], Pennsylvania, [[Kitchener-Waterloo (Ontario, Canada)|Waterloo-Kitchener]], [[Ontario (Canada)|Ontario]], [[Goshen (Indiana, USA)|Goshen]], [[Indiana (USA)|Indiana]], [[Harrisonburg (Virginia, USA)|Harrisonburg]], [[Virginia (USA)|Virginia]], [[Morgantown (Pennsylvania, USA)|Morgantown]], Pennsylvania, as well as two campaigns in [[Florida (USA)|Florida]] in the winter of 1952. In each series of meetings from 1,000 to 2,000 persons accepted Christ for the first time, renewed their covenant as members, or made a deeper consecration as Christians. The work was financed solely by offerings. Although modern methods of organization were used, the methods of preaching and the sermon content, etc., were simple and in conformity with good evangelical Christian and historic Mennonite faith. Over the duration of the campaigns, which ended in the early 1980s, over 100 tent crusades were held.
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Archives of Ontario, Digital-4'']]    The Brunk Brothers Revival Campaign (later known as Brunk Revivals, Inc.), an influential revival work among the Mennonites of North America, began in 1951. It was carried on by Preacher George R. Brunk II (1911-2002) of [[Denbigh (Warwick County, Virginia, USA)|Denbigh]], [[Virginia (USA)|Virginia]], the evangelist, and his layman brother Lawrence (1917-2003), who served as business manager and song leader. This team of Christian workers, using a large tent seating 6,000 persons, moved from one large Mennonite center to another during the open season from April to October, holding nightly meetings in a community for three-four weeks, to revive the church and evangelize non-Christians. The following communities were served through 1952: 1951, [[Lancaster (Pennsylvania, USA)|Lancaster]], [[Pennsylvania (USA)|Pennsylvania]], [[Souderton (Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, USA)|Souderton]], Pennsylvania, [[Orrville (Wayne County, Ohio, USA)|Orrville]], [[Ohio (USA)|Ohio]], [[Manheim (Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, USA)|Manheim]], Pennsylvania; 1952, [[Johnstown (Pennsylvania, USA)|Johnstown]], Pennsylvania, [[Kitchener-Waterloo (Ontario, Canada)|Waterloo-Kitchener]], [[Ontario (Canada)|Ontario]], [[Goshen (Indiana, USA)|Goshen]], [[Indiana (USA)|Indiana]], [[Harrisonburg (Virginia, USA)|Harrisonburg]], [[Virginia (USA)|Virginia]], [[Morgantown (Pennsylvania, USA)|Morgantown]], Pennsylvania, as well as two campaigns in [[Florida (USA)|Florida]] in the winter of 1952. In each series of meetings from 1,000 to 2,000 persons accepted Christ for the first time, renewed their covenant as members, or made a deeper consecration as Christians. The work was financed solely by offerings. Although modern methods of organization were used, the methods of preaching and the sermon content, etc., were simple and in conformity with good evangelical Christian and historic Mennonite faith. Over the duration of the campaigns, which ended in the early 1980s, over 100 tent crusades were held.
  
 
George R. Brunk earned a Th.B. degree from Eastern Mennonite University and a B.A. from the College of William and Mary. He received the B.D., Th.M. and Th.D. degrees from Union Theological Seminary, Richmond, Viriginia. Brunk taught at [[Eastern Mennonite University (Harrisonburg, Virginia, USA)|Eastern Mennonite College]] (now University), 1949-1978, and at Eastern Mennonite Seminary, where he was professor of practical theology. He served as seminary dean, 1967-1976.
 
George R. Brunk earned a Th.B. degree from Eastern Mennonite University and a B.A. from the College of William and Mary. He received the B.D., Th.M. and Th.D. degrees from Union Theological Seminary, Richmond, Viriginia. Brunk taught at [[Eastern Mennonite University (Harrisonburg, Virginia, USA)|Eastern Mennonite College]] (now University), 1949-1978, and at Eastern Mennonite Seminary, where he was professor of practical theology. He served as seminary dean, 1967-1976.

Latest revision as of 03:26, 20 February 2014

Brunk Brothers Revival Tent, Waterloo, Ontario in 1952. Garfield Schmidt photo. Scan provided by Mennonite Archives of Ontario, Digital-4
The Brunk Brothers Revival Campaign (later known as Brunk Revivals, Inc.), an influential revival work among the Mennonites of North America, began in 1951. It was carried on by Preacher George R. Brunk II (1911-2002) of Denbigh, Virginia, the evangelist, and his layman brother Lawrence (1917-2003), who served as business manager and song leader. This team of Christian workers, using a large tent seating 6,000 persons, moved from one large Mennonite center to another during the open season from April to October, holding nightly meetings in a community for three-four weeks, to revive the church and evangelize non-Christians. The following communities were served through 1952: 1951, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, Souderton, Pennsylvania, Orrville, Ohio, Manheim, Pennsylvania; 1952, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, Waterloo-Kitchener, Ontario, Goshen, Indiana, Harrisonburg, Virginia, Morgantown, Pennsylvania, as well as two campaigns in Florida in the winter of 1952. In each series of meetings from 1,000 to 2,000 persons accepted Christ for the first time, renewed their covenant as members, or made a deeper consecration as Christians. The work was financed solely by offerings. Although modern methods of organization were used, the methods of preaching and the sermon content, etc., were simple and in conformity with good evangelical Christian and historic Mennonite faith. Over the duration of the campaigns, which ended in the early 1980s, over 100 tent crusades were held.

George R. Brunk earned a Th.B. degree from Eastern Mennonite University and a B.A. from the College of William and Mary. He received the B.D., Th.M. and Th.D. degrees from Union Theological Seminary, Richmond, Viriginia. Brunk taught at Eastern Mennonite College (now University), 1949-1978, and at Eastern Mennonite Seminary, where he was professor of practical theology. He served as seminary dean, 1967-1976.

[edit] Bibliography

Bishop, Jim. "George Brunk II Dies at 90; Was Evangelist, Seminary Dean." Eastern Mennonite University News Archives. http://www.emu.edu/marketing/news/gbrunk2d.html (accessed 5 December 2009).


Author(s) Harold S. Bender
Sam Steiner
Date Published 2009


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Bender, Harold S. and Sam Steiner. "Brunk Brothers Revival Campaign." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 2009. Web. 29 Jul 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Brunk_Brothers_Revival_Campaign&oldid=113248.

APA style

Bender, Harold S. and Sam Steiner. (2009). Brunk Brothers Revival Campaign. Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 29 July 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Brunk_Brothers_Revival_Campaign&oldid=113248.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 1, p. 453. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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