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Bernardus de Bosch, b. 28 March 1709 at Amsterdam, d. 27 October 1786, a Dutch Mennonite poet. Critics said of him that he considered "delicate, pure, and gently flowing language the chief requirement of a poem." He wrote four small volumes entitled Dichtlievende Verlustigingen (Amsterdam, 1741-88), and Taal- en Dichtkundige Aanmerkingen in connection with these poems. Several translations of psalms published in the hymnbook of the Laus Deo salus populo society, which was used by the congregation in Amsterdam, were from his pen, as well as some songs that were found in Mennonite hymnals. He is not to be confused with the Reformed B. Bosch, several of whose songs were also found in Mennonite hymnals.

[edit] Bibliography

Doopsgezinde Bijdragen (1867): 143; (1900): 78, 94.

Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. Mennonitisches Lexikon, 4 vols. Frankfurt & Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe: Schneider, 1913-1967: v. I, 247.

Kalff, Gerrit. Geschiedenis der Nederlandsche letterkunde. Groningen: Wolters, 1906-1912: V, 477-479, 573, 575.

Molhuysen, P. C. and P. J. Blok. Nieuw Nederlandsch Biografisch Woordenboek, 10 vols. Leiden, 1911-1937: v. IV, 234. Available online at http://www.dbnl.org/titels/titel.php?id=molh003nieu00.


Author(s) Jacob Loosjes
Date Published 1953


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Loosjes, Jacob. "Bosch, Bernardus de (1709-1786)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1953. Web. 22 Aug 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Bosch,_Bernardus_de_(1709-1786)&oldid=120661.

APA style

Loosjes, Jacob. (1953). Bosch, Bernardus de (1709-1786). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 22 August 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Bosch,_Bernardus_de_(1709-1786)&oldid=120661.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 1, p. 392. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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