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After the organization of Ring Akkrum in 1837, Ring Bolsward was established in 1840, with the name, Vereeniging van eenige doopsgezinde gemeenten en leeraren ter bevordering der predikdienst in Zuidwest-Friesland. It was organized by the following six congregations: Bolsward, Hindeloopen, Warns, Witmarsum, Workum, and Woudsend. Later other congregations joined it, including Terschelling in 1896. The union, which held an annual meeting of delegates from member congregations, had the name, Doopsgezinde Vereniging tot bevordering van de predikdienst en het godsdienstonderwijs in Zuidwestelijk Friesland. But it was usually known simply as "Ring Bolsward." Its purpose was to fill vacant pulpits with preachers of other congregations in the organization.

Ring Bolsward was in the 1950s made up of Baard, Balk, Bolsward, Franeker, Harlingen, Hindeloopen, Koudum, Makkum, Sneek, Staveren, Terschelling, Warns, Workum, Woudsend, IJlst, and IJtens.

[edit] Bibliography

Buse, H. J. "Beknopte gesch. van de Ring Bolsward van 1840-1913." Unpublished manuscript.

Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. Mennonitisches Lexikon, 4 vols. Frankfurt & Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe: Schneider, 1913-1967: v. I, 243.


Author(s) Nanne van der Zijpp
Date Published 1953


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Zijpp, Nanne van der. "Bolsward Ring (Friesland, Netherlands)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1953. Web. 14 Jul 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Bolsward_Ring_(Friesland,_Netherlands)&oldid=110386.

APA style

Zijpp, Nanne van der. (1953). Bolsward Ring (Friesland, Netherlands). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 14 July 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Bolsward_Ring_(Friesland,_Netherlands)&oldid=110386.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 1, p. 384. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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