From GAMEO
Jump to: navigation, search
[unchecked revision][checked revision]
(CSV import - 20130820)
(CSV import - 20130823)
 
Line 1: Line 1:
 
[[File:Blair-New-Mennonite-Church-2010.jpg|300px|thumb|right|''The Blair New Mennonite Church as it appeared in 2010 when  
 
[[File:Blair-New-Mennonite-Church-2010.jpg|300px|thumb|right|''The Blair New Mennonite Church as it appeared in 2010 when  
  
used by a Hindu group.  
+
used by a Hindu group.'']]    A Baptist church was originally built in 1853 in Carlisle (renamed Blair in 1858), but soon became a union church shared by a local [[New Mennonite Church of Canada West|New Mennonite]] congregation. The building was shared until 1872 when the New Mennonites erected a building a short distance up the road. The former building then became a public school until 1959 when it reverted to church use. The congregation was part of the [[Mennonite Brethren in Christ|Mennonite Brethren in Christ]] after 1883 after a series of mergers. A Buddhist group met there in 2012.
 
+
'']]    A Baptist church was originally built in 1853 in Carlisle (renamed Blair in 1858), but soon became a union church shared by a local [[New Mennonite Church of Canada West|New Mennonite]] congregation. The building was shared until 1872 when the New Mennonites erected a building a short distance up the road. The former building then became a public school until 1959 when it reverted to church use. The congregation was part of the [[Mennonite Brethren in Christ|Mennonite Brethren in Christ]] after 1883 after a series of mergers. A Buddhist group met there in 2012.
+
  
 
Minister John McNally (1822-1913) and others built the more permanent church in 1872. John McNally had been ordained by [[Hoch, Daniel (1805-1878)|Daniel Hoch]] in 1852 and was a prominent New Mennonite minister. The Blair location slowly lost members, who with the advent of better transportation, went to other New Mennonite churches. The [[Ontario Mennonite Brethren in Christ|Ontario Mennonite Brethren in Christ]] sold the building in 1921 to the Blair Union Sunday School. In 1967 the property was sold to a Church of Christ congregation and the Blair Union Sunday School closed its doors.  A Hindu group used the building in 2012.
 
Minister John McNally (1822-1913) and others built the more permanent church in 1872. John McNally had been ordained by [[Hoch, Daniel (1805-1878)|Daniel Hoch]] in 1852 and was a prominent New Mennonite minister. The Blair location slowly lost members, who with the advent of better transportation, went to other New Mennonite churches. The [[Ontario Mennonite Brethren in Christ|Ontario Mennonite Brethren in Christ]] sold the building in 1921 to the Blair Union Sunday School. In 1967 the property was sold to a Church of Christ congregation and the Blair Union Sunday School closed its doors.  A Hindu group used the building in 2012.

Latest revision as of 14:36, 23 August 2013

The Blair New Mennonite Church as it appeared in 2010 when used by a Hindu group.
A Baptist church was originally built in 1853 in Carlisle (renamed Blair in 1858), but soon became a union church shared by a local New Mennonite congregation. The building was shared until 1872 when the New Mennonites erected a building a short distance up the road. The former building then became a public school until 1959 when it reverted to church use. The congregation was part of the Mennonite Brethren in Christ after 1883 after a series of mergers. A Buddhist group met there in 2012.

Minister John McNally (1822-1913) and others built the more permanent church in 1872. John McNally had been ordained by Daniel Hoch in 1852 and was a prominent New Mennonite minister. The Blair location slowly lost members, who with the advent of better transportation, went to other New Mennonite churches. The Ontario Mennonite Brethren in Christ sold the building in 1921 to the Blair Union Sunday School. In 1967 the property was sold to a Church of Christ congregation and the Blair Union Sunday School closed its doors.  A Hindu group used the building in 2012.

Contents

[edit] Bibliography

Steiner, Samuel. "Text for Missionary Church Tour."  Unpublished manuscript (12 June 2010): 1.

[edit] Additional Information

Original Article from Mennonite Encyclopedia

Vol. 2, p. 627 by Joseph C. Fretz

Hagey-Blair was a community in Waterloo Township, seven miles southeast of Kitchener, Ontario, which had some followers of the Canada West-Ohio movement designed for unification, evangelization, and education. Daniel Hoch took the leading part in forming in 1855 a "Conference Council of the United Mennonite Community of Canada West & Ontario." Hoch is said to have been related to the Kinzies of the Hagey congregation, who agreed with him. Daniel Hege of Illinois, secretary in 1862 of the General Conference, wrote an explanatory letter from Blair while resting at the home of S. B. Baumann, when Hege and Ephraim Hunsberger of Wadsworth, Ohio, were touring eleven churches of Canada West, and calling on numbers of persons. Canadian funds gathered for the Wadsworth School were heaviest in the Waterloo area. No organized church can be named for this community. Meetings were held in the Carlisle School at Blair.


Author(s) Sam Steiner
Date Published February 2013


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Steiner, Sam. "Blair New Mennonite Church (Blair, Ontario, Canada)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. February 2013. Web. 18 Dec 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Blair_New_Mennonite_Church_(Blair,_Ontario,_Canada)&oldid=95038.

APA style

Steiner, Sam. (February 2013). Blair New Mennonite Church (Blair, Ontario, Canada). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 18 December 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Blair_New_Mennonite_Church_(Blair,_Ontario,_Canada)&oldid=95038.




©1996-2014 by the Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. All rights reserved.