From GAMEO
Jump to: navigation, search

Oscar Andersson was born in Ubby, Sweden, and became a member of the Swedish Baptist Church. Alma Doering visited his community and recruited him for work with the Congo Inland Mission (Africa Inter-Mennonite Mission). He joined a pioneering team at Djoko Punda on the Kasai River in 1914.

In his diary Andersson wrote about loneliness while supervising firing of kilns of raw clay bricks; of encounters with African people, language, and culture; and thoughts of how they might best be reached with the Gospel. He also mentioned disagreements among the multinational team over questions of missiology, and personality clashes. He married one of the team members, Sarah Kroeker, a trained nurse and midwife from the Evangelical Mennonite Brethren Church (Fellowship of Evangelical Bible Churches) at Henderson, Nebraska. They buried a stillborn son in Africa.

Differing opinions within the missionary team eventually induced the Anderssons to transfer in 1916 to a mission of Oscar's home church in Kwilu Province west of Djoko. They continued in their service until 1948 when they returned to Sweden.

[edit] Bibliography

An English translation of Oscar Andersson's diary is found in the AIMM archives at the Mennonite Historical Library, Bluffton University.


Author(s) James E Bertsche
Date Published 1989


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Bertsche, James E. "Andersson, Oscar (1886-1979)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1989. Web. 13 Jul 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Andersson,_Oscar_(1886-1979)&oldid=74778.

APA style

Bertsche, James E. (1989). Andersson, Oscar (1886-1979). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 13 July 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Andersson,_Oscar_(1886-1979)&oldid=74778.




Hpbuttns.gif
Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 5, p. 27. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


©1996-2014 by the Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. All rights reserved.